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4 results for Pinehurst
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Record #:
9494
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pinehurst in the Sandhills was established in the late 1890s. Many of the early resorts are gone, either through fires or progress; new ones have emerged, and the city thrives and services in the twenty-first century. Wright discusses the history of the first hundred years.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 9, Sept 2007, p64-66, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
11208
Author(s):
Abstract:
For most of a hundred years, relations between the owners of the Pinehurst Resort and local citizens remained amicable. However, when the Diamondhead Corporation purchased the resort from the Tufts family in 1970, differences arose between local citizens and the new owners over development changes in the way things had been.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
31168
Abstract:
Two factors often shape the outcome of community planning efforts – how planners handle controversy and how they seize opportunity. This article characterizes these factors, identifies strategies to address them, and presents several case studies to illustrate these techniques in practice. In so doing, it offers insights on how to turn a community’s passions to productive use and expand our influence as planning professionals.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 37 Issue , 2012, p19-26, il, bibl
Full Text:
Record #:
35820
Abstract:
The guide featured ten towns, spanning Coast to Mountains. Profiles highlighted what made each town unique. Sup worthy restaurants included Durham’s Bullock’s Barbeque, Greensboro’s the Hungry Fisherman, and The Blue Stove in Pinehurst—Southern Pines. Historical sites included the old Market House in Fayetteville, Wilmington’s Thalian Hall, Raleigh’s Oakwood section, and Bethabara in Winston-Salem. Entertainment hubs included the Charlotte Motor Speedway, High Point’s North Carolina Shakespeare Festival, and Asheville’s Thomas Wolfe Auditorium.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p19-21, 23-24, 26, 28-34, 36-41