NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


26 results for Teachers
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
36451
Author(s):
Abstract:
NetGen’s impact in education and communication can be felt in pedagogical methods and social media networks. The collaborative impact was illustrated in SkillPop, offering pop up classes teaching adults new skills. Highlighted in its profile was Haley Bohon’s inspiration for starting her business and its value for the worldwide community.
Record #:
38202
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among the life lessons the new Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent shared straddled the boundary between personal and professional. Examples of life lessons that impacted him professional and personally: people who inspired him to go into teaching; teaching philosophies such as the importance of building a rapport with students; what it is about teaching that inspires him to still be passionate about the profession.
Record #:
38246
Author(s):
Abstract:
The former owner of one of the nation’s largest Oriental rug distributorships proves success is measured in more than revenue. Proceeds from Zaki Khalifa’s business donated to Akhuwat will partly fulfill his mission: to help Pakistani children have a better quality life. The other part of his mission involves a new career path: teaching Pakistani children at Akhuwat schools.
Record #:
41185
Author(s):
Abstract:
In order to help foster a reconnection with the earth, the Asheville Forest School is a primary school for young children and holds all of its classes outside. In fact, there is no physical school, only acres of land where children learn to identify plants, learn how to start fires, and more.
Source:
Record #:
36277
Author(s):
Abstract:
ECU professor Abbie Brown advocates the development of online education. His promotion took place through his responses to these areas: differences between online and F2F formats; factors involved in its development; the prospect of on-campus courses’ demise; the UNC system’s future in online education.
Record #:
36301
Author(s):
Abstract:
An educational software and e-textbook company has proven to be a maven for North Carolina’s current educational system. Promoting Discovery Educations’ endeavor is a discussion of receptivity already found among today’s students and growing receptivity among educators for their products.
Record #:
35328
Author(s):
Abstract:
For educator Jacob Brooks, defining the year as nerve-wracking was easy, as easy as it was defining the last twelve months as “quite a year.” The challenge was in deciding which of the two events discussed—one personal, the other professional—was more so.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 9, September 2015, p6
Record #:
19399
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Pat McCrory's 2013 budget includes hiring 1,800 new teachers. McCrory supporters believe this is a progressive step in education reform. Skeptics claim 1,800 new teachers is an appeasement and only begin to make-up for the 4,300 teaching positions lost before and during the recession.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
36085
Author(s):
Abstract:
Alluding to an article in an earlier edition about Kate Beckwith, the author discusses his mother who he believed was influenced by East Carolina Teachers Training School’s first principal. In reference to his mother’s teaching career, he noted North Carolina’s contribution to the well-known schoolteacher stereotype. According to him, female teachers could not be married.
Record #:
16145
Author(s):
Abstract:
Educators, parents, and students usually define curriculum as the courses the school offers and students earn credit for taking. Local school boards control the curriculum in North Carolina as long as they follow the guidelines of the State Board of Education. Teachers deliver the curriculum, but courts have established in North Carolina that they do not have the authority under the First Amendment to make changes in it, challenge or fail to follow the school board's curriculum decisions. The authors discuss the lack of First Amendment protection for teachers' curricular speech and the options schools boards have as a result of that lack of protection.
Source:
School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. Issue 1, July 2009, p1-14, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
36072
Author(s):
Abstract:
East Carolina University: known for its Latin verb derived motto and teacher’s training school roots. From it are expectations for ECU to keep living up to the century-old traditions. Helping to keep the promises of education and service were off-campus facilities, the Building Hope Community Life Center and Lucille Gorham Intergenerational Center, and on-campus Volunteer and Service Learning Center.
Record #:
36077
Author(s):
Abstract:
ECU student teachers perhaps can relate to the common concerns cited by this ECTTS student teacher. January 6, 1920 at Greenville’s Joyner School included the day starting with a bell and activities like recess and dinner. Concerns more timely than timeless included games like Sling the Biscuit, a car starting up with a crank, and speeding defined as driving at five miles an hour.
Record #:
31093
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Teaching Fellows Program, the first in the nation, has awarded nearly 6,800 full college scholarships. The state awards high school graduates a full, four-year college scholarship in exchange for their return to teach in the state’s schools after they finish college. Alumni describe their experiences in the program and how it prepared them for the classroom.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 6, June 2004, p12-13, il, por
Record #:
4728
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Coast Guard Station on Ocracoke Island closed in 1996 after nearly six decades of service. Now, through a $400,000 appropriation from the North Carolina General Assembly, the 10,000-square-foot building will be renovated for use as a professional development center for North Carolina teachers. The North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teachers (NCCAT) at Cullowhee and the East Carolina University maritime studies program will manage the building.
Source:
Record #:
4739
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jeanne Laws (Elkin City High School), Amy Orr Hobbs (Robbinsville High School), Vickie Honeycutt (Mt. Pleasant High School, Cabarrus County), and Judy Lewis (Grantham School) are Regional Teachers of the Year for 2000-2001. Among items the winners receive are a $5,000 stipend, software and computer training, and a one-week seminar at the North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching at Cullowhee.
Source:
Subject(s):