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6 results for Stagville Plantation (Durham County)
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Record #:
16963
Abstract:
Paul Carrington was born September 25, 1808 at home on Stagville plantation. His father and grandfather were part of the state's planter society and becoming a planter was Carrington's passion. He can be portrayed as the quintessential planter for his diversified investments, extensive land holdings, and paternal approach to slaves under his care.
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Record #:
23619
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Michael Twitty creates southern dishes on Stagville, the largest historical slave plantation in North Carolina. Twitty works to address the history of Southern food, especially as it relates to slaves. He uses cooking methods that Stagville slaves would have used, such as roasting pork shoulders over a rack of tree saplings.
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Record #:
24535
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The Stagville Center was built in 1799 in Durham County, North Carolina by Richard Bennehan. The Gregorian-style plantation home is now owned by the State of North Carolina and will be transformed into the Stagville Center for Preservation Technology.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 7, December 1977, p18-20, il
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Record #:
7957
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The state adopted its first slave code in 1715. This document defined the social, economic, and physical places of enslaved people. Most of the slaves purchased in the colony came from Virginia and South Carolina, and most lived on large plantations in the eastern section. The largest plantation was Stagville, established in 1787, and located in parts of what is now Orange and three other counties. More than 900 slaves worked on the 30,000-acre plantation.
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Record #:
13459
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Stagville was one of the largest antebellum plantations in North Carolina. It covered 30,000 acres of land in Orange and three other counties on which almost nine hundred enslaved individuals worked in the years before the Civil War. Puryear describes what life there was like.
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Record #:
30798
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Through a donation of nearly seventy acres and several buildings, North Carolina will establish a Center for Preservation Technology on a portion of the historic Stagville plantation in northern Durham County. The proposed center, a comprehensive research and education facility for historic and archaeological preservation, will be first state facility of its kind in the nation.
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