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3 results for Sandhills (Ga. and N.C.)
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Record #:
7915
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Abstract:
The tiger salamander's name comes from its coloration which features dark yellow spots and bars across a dark background. It grows to lengths of seven to eleven inches. It is an extremely difficult creature to find, as it spends ten months of the year beneath the surface of the ground feeding on earthworms and other insects. It leaves its burrow in December and January to breed in nearby ponds and then goes back underground. Although tiger salamanders were once widespread across the state, they are now confined to the edge of the Sandhills in Robeson, Hoke, and Scotland Counties.
Record #:
16231
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in the Sandhills region of North Carolina, the Sandhills Family Heritage Association (SFHA) works to preserve the unique natural and cultural heritage of African-American families in the Sandhills region, while also carrying on those traditions that have helped sustain the community and culture for hundreds of years.\r\nEnvironmental conservationists have long recognized the Sandhills region as one of the most distinctive and endangered ecosystems in North Carolina and the country. The unique African-American culture that flourishes here is, likewise, nationally significant. The Sandhills Family Heritage Association recognizes that the preservation of its culture is inextricably linked to the land and its residents'ability to live self-sufficiently from that land. As a result, this grassroots organization's work focuses on building what are called \"Communities of HOPE\" through heritage preservation, ownership of land, public education, and economic development, all of which are inter-connected goals given the nature of African-American culture in the Sandhills region.
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Record #:
5044
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lying between the southern Piedmont and the Coastal Plain is an area known as the Sandhills. Two million years ago it was the shore of the ocean. Today the North Carolina Wildlife Commission manages 60,000 acres, the Sandhills Game Land, which covers parts of Moore, Richmond, and Scotland Counties. This area is home to a rich diversity of plants and wildlife--some found nowhere else.
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