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8 results for Salem--History
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Record #:
13105
Abstract:
Arriving in 1753, the Moravians came to North Carolina in search of a new life rooted in Christian beliefs left behind in Germany. Led by men such as Peter of Chelcic and Gregory, \"the patriarch,\" the Moravians founded the village of Salem, in 1765-1766.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 23, Apr 1957, p13-14, il
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Record #:
14671
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In 1947, B. J. Pfohl directed Salem's 175-year-old local band which consisted of horn instruments and was traditionally a male-only activity until the 1940s when several girls entered.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 42, Mar 1947, p3, 18, il
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Record #:
19731
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A reprint of the travel journal of the Rev. Charles A. Van Vleck documenting travel from Salem, NC to Bethlehem, PA in October 1826. Van Vleck was the pastor of Moravian congregation of Bethania, NC from 1822-1826 and held various other positions within the faith during his life.
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Record #:
20121
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Salem was founded by the Moravians, an austere religious organization, who believed in peace rather than bearing arms. Prior to the American Civil War, the town and its community made some exceptions to its rules, and a militia was formed and sent into battle. The church also lost influence over the town as more non-Moravians were permitted to settle in Salem, changing community dynamics. The author looks at how the excesses of antebellum Salem and hardships of war changed the once rigidly religious community during the mid-19th century.
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Record #:
20433
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Adelaide Fries was born in Salem on November 12, 1871 and did on November 29, 1949. The author writes a brief memorial to her life and especially focuses on her career as a historian and writer. The final two pages of the article outline the various publications she wrote, edited, and collaborated on, most dealing with North Carolina, Salem, and the Moravians.
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Record #:
21433
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In 1755, Moravian Church leader Nicolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf designed a town to be built in Forsyth County, North Carolina. The town was based on von Zinzendorf's belief that the new city be inward looking, a religious refuge, church and community centered, healthful and open to outside trade and communication. His plan for the town of Unitas, now Salem, was founded on the ideas of Roman architect Pollio Vitruvius and found little acceptance at the New Moravian headquarters in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. After von Zinzendorf's passing in 1760, the Moravian leader in America, August Spangenberg developed a new grid plan to better fit the current Moravian needs and philosophy.
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Record #:
16085
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Salem, once a thriving craftsmen settlement, now exists as a living history museum. Moravian settlers moved south and established Salem in 1752. Today, tourists can walk through the historic settlement and enter various trade buildings such as the historic bakery or tobacco shop.
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Record #:
38283
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Old Salem, settled in 1772 by Moravians, has had its history well preserved due to members compiling detailed daily life accounts. Because of this, the task taken on in the 1950s to preserve Salem and turn it into to Old Salem was possible. Currently, Old Salem reflects historical integrity in its 107 historic buildings and individuals who realistically reenact daily life, evident in the accompanied photographs. An example of a conscientiously preserved historic building is the tavern George Washington lodged in during his visit in 1791, looking much as it did during his visit.
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