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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Roads
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Record #:
27685
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In this Transportation and Logistics Round Table, transportation experts gathered to discuss the industry’s successes and challenges in North Carolina.
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Record #:
31261
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Known as “The Good Roads State,” North Carolina maintains the nation’s largest state highway system. Governor Locke Craig in the early 1900s set up the first highway commission, and in the 1920s, the so-called “mud tax” spurred widespread road construction. This article presents historical and personal accounts on the finest roads in North Carolina, from the Four Mile Desert Road in Perquimans County to Tatum Gap Road outside Andrews and Robbinsville.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, May 1999, p14-17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
434
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Part of the \"Highway Robbery\" series, this article examines the construction of roads leading to Topsail Beach and a schedule of their completion.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 22, May 1992, p11-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
436
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Part of the \"Highway Robbery\" series, this section discusses the environmental impact of highway building.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 22, May 1992, p8-10 Periodical Website
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Record #:
461
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Part of the \"Highway Robbery\" series, this article focuses on the proposed highways through Pleasant Hill and High Point College.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 23, June 1992, p8-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
538
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As part of the \"Highway Robbery\" series this article offers several suggestions for the elimination of wasteful spending on highways, and discusses the construction of I-26 through the mountains and the creation of bike routes along the highway.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 25, June 1992, p2-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
12985
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Adopt-A-Highway is the North Carolina Department of Transportation's program to improve highway cleanliness. Under the plan businesses volunteer to adopt a two-mile stretch of highway and keep it litter free. In just over a year, one thousand businesses have signed up. The state puts up an Adopt A Highway sign with the name of the business keeping that particular stretch clean underneath it. First Citizens Banks leads the program with over 300 miles adopted.
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Record #:
10986
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When We the People of North Carolina magazine interviewed Lauch Faircloth, Chairman of the State Highway Commission, in July 1969, he had been in office less than six months. In this interview, Faircloth discusses current policies, accomplishments, and plans for the future.
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Record #:
10900
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We the People of North Carolina magazine interviews Lauch Faircloth, Chairman of the State Highway Commission, on the status of the state's highway system.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 7, July 1969, p42-43, 100, por
Record #:
12923
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Known as the Greenville to Greenville Line as well as the Paint Mountain Road, the path connecting the eastern and western portions of North Carolina has been used by drovers, stage coaches, and railroads throughout the state's history.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 4, July 1959, p11-12, il
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Record #:
30823
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A total of $3.4 billion was provided by the Federal government to the states for primary, secondary, and urban highways and roads, and the interstate system. However, North Carolina is only receiving 3.7% of the funds, the largest portion of this going to primary roads and the interstate system.
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Record #:
13114
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Regarding road construction in North Carolina, this article is about the expanding transportation system from the 1920s through the 1950s. Focusing on the changes in technology as well as the labor force, the actions of companies such as the H.F. Ramsey Company, Macon Construction Company, as well as individual contractors like James F. Powell, Jr. are featured.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 24, Apr 1957, p46-47, il
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Record #:
13497
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The Old Lexington Highway, now a quiet stretch of road, was once the Highway of the Blind Tiger, a sort of carnival road, a weekend gathering place for panderers and everyday citizens bound on a spree.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 32, Jan 1954, p5-6, f
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Record #:
13283
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Slowly, but steadily, modernistic highways are speedily replacing the original antiquated system.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 9, Aug 1953, p3-5, f
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Record #:
13767
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The Blue Ridge, a historic barrier to travel, is being pierced by a 55-mile-per-hour super highway which sets new rules in road building.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 43, Mar 1952, p6, 12-13, f
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