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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Purple martin
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Record #:
7308
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Abstract:
Purple martins depend upon people to provide nesting structures, a characteristic that makes them unique among songbirds. The Manns Harbor Bridge between Manns Harbor and Roanoke Island has been an annual summer roosting place for over 100,000 martins for the past twenty-five years. The roost supports martins from 150 miles around. By late August most of the birds depart for Brazil.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 37 Issue 6, June 2005, p28, il
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Record #:
8417
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Purple martins are fairly common across North Carolina. The state's population depends almost entirely upon mankind for its nesting accommodations. In the South, purple martins nest either in houses or gourds. Lee discusses how to build an inexpensive martin house and what type of gourds the birds prefer for nesting. He also discusses where to place the housing; what to expect after the martins settle in; natural enemies of purple martins; and food martins eat.
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Record #:
8
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Purple martins, the largest, highest-flying, and most popular of the swallow family, are rumored to be effective for controlling mosquitos.
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Record #:
5760
Author(s):
Abstract:
Purple martins begin arriving in North Carolina in March, and they are a welcome insect controller. Not everyone has success in attracting these birds to backyard houses, which can range from gourds to several-storied birdhouses. Powell discusses seven steps to avoid in order to become a welcome \"landlord.\"
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Record #:
31191
Author(s):
Abstract:
Each year thousands of purple martins migrate from South America to the United States, with the greatest number nesting in rural North Carolina and other southeastern areas. This article explains all about purple martins, their housing specifications, diet, behavior, and how bird watchers can attract them to their yards.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Feb 2002, p26-27, il
Record #:
34585
Author(s):
Abstract:
The purple martin spends their breeding and nesting season in North Carolina and spend the winter in South America. After finding martin houses unattended, the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences teamed up with the Wake Audubon Society to tend to the houses and move them to more desirable locations. The new locations also allow the public to observe the behavior of the purple martins.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Sum 2008, p8-10, il