NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


25 results for Oysters
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
22589
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina oysters are a keystone species for the health of the state's estuaries. Since 2003, a diverse group of stakeholders has worked to develop initiatives related to the protection and restoration of the state's oyster populations.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p18-19, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
25164
Author(s):
Abstract:
Members of the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation gathered for a party involving musical entertainment, oysters, and speeches.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, Spring 1987, p7, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
17042
Author(s):
Abstract:
Leggett discusses how the oyster reigns in eastern North Carolina, from recipes to restaurants.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
31544
Author(s):
Abstract:
Celebrate the south’s bivalve renaissance at one of these new oyster bars. This article features two North Carolina restaurants, Sea Level in Charlotte and The Kathrine Brasserie and Bar in Winston-Salem.
Source:
Record #:
19343
Abstract:
With increased development and growing populations, oysters are subject to contamination from human and animal waste. But North Carolina is cracking down on contaminated shellfish with cleaner water and filtration.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
9444
Author(s):
Abstract:
Disease, overharvesting, pollution, poor water quality, and habitat destruction have caused the Eastern oyster to decline over 90 percent in the state during the last century. Concern for the oyster's future has brought together state agencies like the North Carolina Department of Marine Fisheries and other state conservation groups to chart a course of action. There is now a statewide plan to save North Carolina's oysters by building hatcheries and recycling oyster shells.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p42-44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
27629
Author(s):
Abstract:
Phil Gagnon, a resident of Emerald Isle and oyster harvester, discusses his oyster garden and encourages others to raise oysters as well.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2016, p24-26, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
23114
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Daily Reflector's associate editor, Bobby Burns, continues his quest for an appealing oyster dish by preparing traditional oyster stew.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Spring 2015, p15-17, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
6924
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Oyster Festival, now in its twenty-fourth year, is held in October on Ocean Isle Beach. The festival draws 25,000 people and is a celebration of the coastal life of North Carolina, above and below the water. Activities include an oyster stew cook-off, musical entertainment, shopping, and the popular North Carolina Oyster Shucking Contest.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p192-194, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
25188
Author(s):
Abstract:
Penny Brinkley announces the 6th annual Pamlico-Tar River Foundation Oyster Roast. The festivities the event includes as well as merchandise available are all covered.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 11 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p4, il
Record #:
30692
Abstract:
Oyster roasts are an eastern North Carolina tradition during the winter. In this article, the author discusses traditions in Plymouth, North Carolina, the process of roasting oysters, and family oyster recipes.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 12, Dec 2014, p16, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
31674
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rose Bay Oyster House is one of about twenty shucking houses in North Carolina, and the only one in the state that has its own oyster beds. Henderson Miles, a manager of the Rose Bay company, discusses oyster harvesting and some of the problems facing the oyster industry. According to Jim Brown of the Division of Commercial and Sports Fisheries, some of the problems are pollution and the lack of substrate for oysters to live.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Aug 1974, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28791
Author(s):
Abstract:
The boring sponge is narrowing the regions that are open to shellfish harvests free of the infestation. The boring sponge has a major effect on oyster populations and pose an economic problem to oyster farmers. The author discusses a study he created to test how oysters were affected by the substrate on which the oysters grow. The results of the study and the problem are detailed.
Source:
Record #:
16016
Author(s):
Abstract:
For years the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries has been building oyster reefs from Dare County on the northern coast to Brunswick County on the southern. Miller discusses how it is done and the success of the program.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Feb 2012, p10-11, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
25050
Author(s):
Abstract:
At an annual Seafood Quality and Safety Workshop at Pine Knoll Shores, Wayne Mobley teaches people the proper way to shuck oysters and clams. He explains the best way to do this without injuring yourself. Also included are several recipes.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2002, p21-22, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):