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Record #:
16037
Abstract:
Housing North Carolina Awards recognize affordable housing developments that can serve as models for other communities. Criteria include affordability, design, contribution to the community, and other features, such as services for residents. The winners are Choanoke Area Development Association of North Carolina, Inc. (Rich Square); Allison Summit (Statesville); Gateway Village (Gastonia); Tanglewood and Bermuda Run Apartments (Warsaw); Hunters Hill (Winston-Salem); and My Sister Susan's House (Greensboro).
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 62 Issue 1, Jan 2012, p9, il
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Record #:
18598
Abstract:
Housing North Carolina Awards recognize affordable housing developments that can serve as models for other communities. Criteria include affordability, design, contribution to the community, and other features, such as services for residents. Two municipalities receiving the award are Clyde for Barefoot Ridge, a 43-room community, and Fayetteville for Carolina Commons, a large-scale revitalization of a downtown public housing complex.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 62 Issue 1O, Nov 2012, p12, il
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Record #:
21070
Abstract:
Housing North Carolina Awards recognize affordable housing developments that can serve as models for other communities. Criteria include affordability, design, contribution to the community, and other features, such as services for residents. The six winners for 2013 are East Village (Monroe); Smith Farm (Winston-Salem); The Enclave (Winston-Salem); Park Terrace Apartments (High Point); Wesley Heights (Taylorsville); and Village Crossing (Greensboro).
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 63 Issue 8, Sept/Oct 2013, p12, il
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Record #:
23044
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Abstract:
Raleigh faces an affordable housing crisis and recently turned down an opportunity to improve the problem. The city has lacked an overarching vision to solve the crisis, but that may soon change with upcoming City Council housing plan presentations.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 20, May 2015, p5-6, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23593
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Abstract:
After nearly 70 years, the city of Raleigh decided to demolish a small town that took shape after World War II to accommodate returning GI's.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 24, June 2015, p12-16, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24081
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Eblen Charities is a non-profit organization has followed its mission, 'help people stop hurting', for twenty-two years. Ove the years, Eblen has assisted tens of thousands of families through a number of programs and events, including dental programs, housing assistance, and health assistance.
Record #:
24082
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eblen Charities is a non-profit organization has followed its mission, 'help people stop hurting', for twenty-two years. Ove the years, Eblen has assisted tens of thousands of families through a number of programs and events, including dental programs, housing assistance, and health assistance.
Record #:
24135
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Abstract:
The author discusses the 2008 mortgage meltdown in North Carolina and the reasons for the fall in the housing market and how the meltdown will have political and economic impacts for years to come.
Record #:
24697
Abstract:
This article presents a new type of home for North Carolinians, a domed-like structure with a metal frame and spacious interior. The design started with a domed ski lodge and has taken off in other areas of the state.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 1, June 1952, p12-13, il
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Record #:
27005
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An interview with Michael Stegman, a University of North Carolina professor, reveals the complexity underlying the shortage of affordable housing. If the housing problem is not dealt with, the Triangle’s prosperity will be its own undoing, as high housing costs prevent businesses from attracting the labor force they need.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Jan 26-Feb 28 1989, p5-6, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27208
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Raleigh has proposed the Penny for Housing tax, a progressive tax that helps people in low-income communities to access affordable housing that they're being priced out of. The city's goal is to prevent further concentrations of minority and low-income people and subsidized housing by collecting additional property taxes.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 25, June 2016, p8-9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27219
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It's been about a decade since home prices peaked just before the housing catastrophe that nearly destroyed the American economy. In aggregate, the housing market has bounced back. Raleigh and Durham-Chapel Hill are doing well overall, but a closer look shows that home values in downtown Durham have risen more than anywhere else in the Triangle.
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Record #:
27427
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A year after The Independent’s 1990 report on rental property conditions and the behavior of landlords in the Triangle Area, some progress has been made. Durham has created a Housing Appeals Board and a bill has passed the state House proposing housing reforms. Minimum standards still do not exist in Wake County or Durham County and proposals to create them have been slow or nonexistent. Low-income individuals and rural residents continue to suffer the most under current conditions.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 24, June 12-18 1991, p7, 9 Periodical Website
Record #:
27744
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Abstract:
Durham City Council and Durham County Commissioners are taking steps to launch an affordable housing plan. The plan would include units to be designated near the proposed light-rail stops in Durham. The resolution that was passed states that fifteen percent of all units within a half-mile of the stations should be affordable. Article includes map of Durham and chart of housing units near each stop.
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Record #:
27755
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Abstract:
People’s Durham has been awarded a Citizen Award by IndyWeek. The group’s mission is to “further the agenda of justice in Durham” and to increase the power and influence of the working class in Durham. The group has been noted for their work coordinating community projects, supporting public and affordable housing projects, and lobbying for education.
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