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6 results for Hispanic Americans
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Record #:
4290
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hispanics are attracted to North Carolina by a moderate climate, job opportunities, and low cost of living. There are approximately 230,000 living in the state. The once stereotypical image of Hispanic-as-migrant no longer is applicable, as many now work in construction, food service, and factories, as well as higher paying jobs, including engineering, medicine, and law. A statistical profile of the 1997 Hispanic population by counties is included.
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Record #:
4349
Author(s):
Abstract:
H. Nolo Martinez, faculty member at North Carolina State University, was appointed director of the newly created Office of Hispanic/Latino Affairs in September 1998. The office develops and coordinates state and local programs to meet needs in the Hispanic/Latino community. In an interview, Martinez discusses the Hispanic/Latino needs and how they might be addressed.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p13-17, il, por, f
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Record #:
4369
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the past decade the Hispanic population increased 128 percent and the Asian 83 percent in Alexander, Burke, Caldwell, and Catawba Counties. Hispanic and Asians are drawn by a large demand for manufacturing, service, and construction jobs. Employers help these workers adjust to new surroundings by hiring bilingual individuals to work with them, providing work-site classes in the English language, and having company supervisors learn the foreign language of the workers.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 11, Nov 1999, p10, il, f
Record #:
4506
Abstract:
The purpose of the federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 was to prevent racial discrimination in housing. Still, Hispanics encounter discrimination when seeking living quarters, especially in the private rental markets. Brown-Graham discusses the extent of housing discrimination, what recourse an individual has under current law, and options a local government has to see these laws are followed.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p45-51, il, f
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Record #:
6718
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of the state's 220,000 construction workers, 65,000 are Latino. They are typically productive, rarely miss work, and are willing to put in long hours. Martin discusses how Latino labor influences the way things are built and what materials are used in the construction. He also discusses why Latino workers get injured or killed at a higher rate than other construction workers and how some are exploited by employers.
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Record #:
7668
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hispanic population in the state is approximately 500,000. Many have found work in construction, agriculture, textiles, manufacturing, maintenance, and hospitality. Duplin, Lee, Sampson, Montgomery, and Chatham Counties have the highest percentages of Hispanics. To serve this growing population, a number of the state's electric cooperatives have hired Spanish-speaking customer service representatives.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 37 Issue 9, Sept 2005, p12-14, il
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