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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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50 results for "Wildlife management"
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Record #:
26527
Abstract:
Eight North Carolina farms are currently participating in a special wildlife management project in which they are willing to modify farm operations to increase wildlife populations on their land. Each farm is managed to fulfill the needs of the landowners and also improve wildlife habitat.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 3, May/June 1990, p14, il, por
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Record #:
26554
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Pete Bromley is the new wildlife extension specialist at the N.C. Agricultural Extension Service, a public outreach program of land grant universities. He is in charge of activities in wildlife, inland fisheries, and aquaculture, and is developing programs in wetland and waterfowl management.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1990, p8-9, il
Record #:
26553
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Maligned and misunderstood, modern hunters are under increasing scrutiny. In response to the current anti-hunting sentiment, the North Carolina Wildlife Federation is acting on several fronts to ensure that properly regulated hunting and properly managed wildlife go hand in hand.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1990, p6-7, il
Record #:
6621
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In recent years there has been a demand from North Carolina hunters for more big game in the state. In this article Barick discusses the three objectives of North Carolina's big game restoration program and the methods by which they will be accomplished. The objectives are to increase the supply of big game in the state, principally deer at the program's start; to create more refuges and public hunting grounds; and to develop more efficient big game management techniques.
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Record #:
6630
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In the early 1950s, the carp population in Lake Mattamuskeet was destroying natural waterfowl food-plants which were necessary for migratory birds that winter at the lake. Cahoon discusses the removal of the carp, the prevention of their reentry into the lake, and the effects of the removal.
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Record #:
6786
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In Part 2 of his discussion of management problems of North Carolina's wild turkey population, Gooden discusses turkey hunting laws and possible revisions; illegal hunting; misconceptions about raising turkeys in captivity and using them for restocking; and turkey diseases caused by the use of certain fertilizers in fields where turkeys forage.
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Record #:
8884
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In June 1969, the Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base received the Secretary of Defense Conservation Award, which is presented annually to the armed forces installation which has organized the best program for conservation of natural resources. In 1969, 241 military installations competed for the award. The wildlife management program includes food plots, small game strips, plantings for doves, experimental woody stock plantings, green-tree duck impoundment, and predator control.
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Record #:
8923
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North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has changed its big game reporting system for the for the 1972-1973 hunting season. Previously a compulsory big game tagging system was in effect for all big game killed on the Wildlife Commission's Game Lands, but did not furnish information on big game killed off the game lands. Dean discusses how the new system, a statewide voluntary tagging program, will work.
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Record #:
9044
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The prime objective of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission's game lands program is to provide more hunters with more lands where they are free to go whenever the seasons are open. Amundson describes the program's eastern section, which is located in the Coastal Plains and covers over 664,512 acres that are under intensive wildlife management.
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Record #:
9070
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This is the second in a series describing the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's game lands. These are areas open to hunting by the public during the regular season. A special games land permit is required to hunt on these managed lands. The Northern Game Lands consist of 395, 785 acres that include Pisgah National Forest Game Land, South Mountains Game Land, Thurmond Chatham Game Land, and the Cherokee National Game Land.
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Record #:
9800
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The white-tailed deer population in the state is at an all-time high. Scott discusses how this happened and what needs to be done to keep the numbers up.
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Record #:
26904
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John Gottschalk, counsel member of the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, presented at the 37th Annual Convention of the North Carolina Wildlife Federation. Wildlife managers face many challenges in this decade, including use and exploitation, disappearing petroleum resources, wetland needs, energy demands and fisheries, and the personal power plant boom.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 7, July 1982, p5-12
Record #:
26942
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Problems or progress in wildlife management depends on the understanding that we all have a share in the wildlife resource. Landowners, sportsmen, and citizens must all share the responsibility and the cost of actively managing the resource so that it becomes more than just a by-product or a victim of other land uses.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept/Oct 1982, p4, il
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Record #:
1482
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Against the backdrop of the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission's forty-year effort to return the wild turkey to abundance, Seamster relates the tale of a long-time hunter who has learned to treat the bird as a renewable resource.
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Record #:
1946
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The comeback of wood duck populations in the eastern U.S. qualifies as a major wildlife management success story. In 1993 biologists banded over 2,500 wood ducks in the Tuckertown and Pee Dee River reservoirs as part of a new wildlife management program.
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