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24 results for "University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Institute of Marine Sciences"
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Record #:
25500
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UNC marine scientists identified and analyzed over 300 sharks seized from illegal shark fishing in the Galápagos. The fishermen were planning to sell the sharks because they have high market value in China for shark fin soup. Marine scientists acknowledge that fishermen need to eat and have jobs, but sharks are also an economic resource for tourism and diving operations.
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25671
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North Carolina could become the first state to generate wind power from in-water turbines. UNC researchers and Duke Energy have teamed up to install three pilot wind turbines. They are studying the effects of wind farms on fishing industries, public perceptions, and legal implications.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Winter 2010, p30-34, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25676
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According to UNC researchers, climate change must be addressed now, despite debates on whether it is real or not. North Carolina will likely see more intense droughts and storms that will cause severe flooding and landslides. Researchers advise improving energy efficiency and changing development patterns, especially at the coast and in the mountains.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 3, Spring 2010, p8-17, il, por Periodical Website
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25673
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Recent research on the Cambrian explosion, which occurred over 500 million years ago, is changing our understanding of evolution and the history of animal life. Geochemist Justine Ries sampled ancient rocks in Namibia and found evidence of sulfur isotopes. His findings provide insight to the environmental conditions of the Cambrian explosion.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Winter 2010, p38-40, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25672
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UNC marine scientists Jan and Brigitte Kohlmeyer pioneered the field of marine mycology, and their herbarium is the definitive reference collection of marine and estuarine fungi. One of their most exciting discoveries occurred in Morehead City, where they found over one-hundred new species of fungi growing in the salt marshes.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Winter 2010, p35-37, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25725
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Harmful algae blooms often occur in China’s third largest lake, Taihu. According to marine biologist Hans Paerl, nutrient-rich sewage from wastewater plants and pollution from factories are the main culprits. Paerl is working with Chinese scientists to recommend pollution controls that could help restore water quality in the lake.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall 2008, p38-39, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25796
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Marine scientist Alberto Scotti develops computer models to figure out how underwater waves work and produce energy. According to Scotti, his model can also help us to understand how blood vessels or machinery function.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Fall 2007, p25-27, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25867
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Andreas Teske is studying bacteria and archaea in deep-sea sediment cores off the coast of Peru. Teske aims to identify microbial species’ RNA sequences to better understand climate cycling and change.
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Record #:
25894
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The highest number of hurricanes has occurred in coastal North Carolina, making the state extremely vulnerable to flooding and other disastrous impacts. UNC researchers are conducting studies to learn about community evacuation decisions and disaster response, and to develop models that predict storm surge and ecological changes resulting from hurricanes.
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25911
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Marine scientists and students lived underwater for ten days at the Aquarius undersea laboratory in Key Largo, Florida. The team of aquanauts was there to study sponge species and their role in water filtration.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Winter 2005, p14-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26017
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Coral reefs are threatened by global warming and overfishing in the Caribbean. John Bruno, assistant professor of marine sciences, found that nutrients from chemical fertilizers accelerate coral disease.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Spring 2004, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26048
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Graduate students are teaming with fishermen to help sustain the catch. According to Eileen Vandenburgh and Galen Johnson, fishermen understand more on some issues than scientists do because they interact with the marine environment every day. Local knowledge is helping them have a better understanding of clam and shrimp populations.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Spring 2003, p18-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26032
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In the 1990s, a dinoflagellate called Pfiesteria was reported to be toxic to fish and humans in North Carolina. UNC researchers recently reexamined Pfiesteria and similar species. According to their studies, harmful algal blooms and fish kills are likely caused by multiple species and factors, and cannot solely be attributed to Pfiesteria.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Fall 2002, p15-17, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26103
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Marine scientist Chris Martens went to Brazil to track the effects of land use on atmospheric gas exchange. He is interested in Amazonian rain forest respiration because it may protect us from global warming and influence oceanic processes.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 17 Issue 3, Spring 2001, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26130
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Hans Paerl and Rick Leuttich, Carolina marine scientists, are concerned about fish kills and algal blooms in the Neuse River because they may be a sign of declining water quality. Their new monitoring project is confirming that the health of fish is influenced by nitrogen loading, oxygen levels, and water circulation patterns.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p9-12, il, por Periodical Website
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