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42 results for "Tobacco industry"
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Record #:
1131
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Abstract:
A series of articles discusses tobacco's impact on North Carolina's and the U.S. economy, the flue-curing process, and the prognosis for tobacco's future.
Source:
North Carolina State Economist (NoCar HD 1401 T34), Vol. Issue , June 1993, p1-4, por
Record #:
1186
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Abstract:
Albert Monk III is CEO of Farmville-based Monk-Austin, Inc., the fourth-largest tobacco processing company in the United States.
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Record #:
1198
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The Friends of Tobacco, a group of farmers, businessmen, legislators, and other tobacco advocates in the state, argues that smoking doesn't cause cancer and that the tobacco industry is being discriminated against.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 33, Aug 1993, p10-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1258
Abstract:
In this special advertising section, the Tobacco Growers Association of North Carolina discusses the economic impact of the state's tobacco industry, stating that it generated $14 billion, some 20 percent of the state's economic activity, in 1992.
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Record #:
778
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The Triangle (Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill) tobacco industry is known for its humid auctions and its colorful auctioneers.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 34, Aug 1992, p6-9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30233
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During the past two years the North Carolina State Ports Authority has seen a substantial increase in the number of shipping lines calling at Wilmington for containerized tobacco. This new traffic is credited to efforts by the tobacco industry itself.
Source:
Cargo (NoCar HE 554 N8 C36x), Vol. 17 Issue 2, 2nd Quarter 1992, p13-14
Record #:
12937
Abstract:
Oxford native Michael Cutts out chanted forty-eight other professional tobacco auctioneers to win the 1988 World Tobacco Auctioneering Championship held in Danville, North Carolina.
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Record #:
12607
Abstract:
Richard J. Reynolds is an initial member of the NORTH CAROLINA magazine Business Hall of Fame. He was the founder of the RJ Reynolds Tobacco Company. Among its famous products were Prince Albert pipe tobacco and perhaps the most famous cigarette of all time - Camel.
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Record #:
31314
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s congressional delegation, along with members from other tobacco producing states, will be trying to cash in some green stamps this year as they try to save the federal tobacco program. Federal support of the tobacco industry is being criticized for the negative effects of tobacco on health, and faces competition with foreign markets and imported tobacco leaves.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 3, Mar 1985, p20-21, il
Record #:
25601
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Abstract:
Located in Tobaccoville, a new R.J. Reynolds $800 million dollar plant is currently under construction. The new plant will cover 26 acres of land, employ 2,000 construction workers, have a cafeteria and medical facility, and produce 120 billion cigarettes a year. The Tobaccoville plant is part of a billion dollar, 10-year expansion program for Reynolds Tobacco, which employs more than 12,000 workers in Winston-Salem.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 24, Dec. 21-Jan 17 1984, p4-5, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31416
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina members of Congress have been working to save the government program that gives a support price to the tobacco leaf when it is marketed. Changes are being made to freeze the support price on the 1983 crop at the 1982 level, and to phase out allotment leasing. This would have a drastic effect on North Carolina small farms.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 8, Aug 1983, p24-25, il
Record #:
13266
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Abstract:
Parker examines the manufacturing aspects of the tobacco industry in North Carolina, where companies like RJ Reynolds and Philip Morris are spending large sums of money to stay competitive in this highly profitable industry.
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Record #:
29338
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Abstract:
Anti-tobacco sentiment has risen since cigarette smoking was blamed for thousands of deaths each year. This year the federal government made substantive reductions in its support for tobacco, which has had tremendous economic, political, and cultural importance in North Carolina. Despite this, state politicians and tobacco spokesmen have responded with little protest.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 5, May 1981, p12-59, il, por
Record #:
24485
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Abstract:
This article presents the history of cigarettes, tobacco, and smoking in North Carolina, as well as presenting a number of historic advertisements for cigarettes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 9, February 1978, p10-15, il
Full Text:
Record #:
21318
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1899 and 1904, Durham native Edward James Parrish lived in Japan as a representative for James B. Duke's American Tobacco Company. Parrish worked closely with the Murai Brothers Company Ltd., to improve production, financing, and marketing techniques for the tobacco company. In 1904, the Japanese Diet introduced and passed legislation that began government ownership of all tobacco manufacturing, Parrish was influential in the company receiving a good settlement with the government.
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