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24 results for "Material culture"
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Record #:
27699
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Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina examined the jewelry styles prevalent in the Chesapeake during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century. Portraits of Chesapeake ladies reveal significant information about the most personal aspects of material wealth and culture, and the use of jewelry in economic and social structure.
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Record #:
27696
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Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a survey of upholstery practices in South Carolina during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The inventories of early householders tell us what people needed and used, and are an expression of personal taste during that time period.
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Record #:
27636
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Delftware was a variety of ceramic wares offered by British merchants in the eighteenth century. Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study of delftware and found a connection to socio-economic structure in Kent County, Maryland.
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Record #:
35834
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Located on Cane Creek in Almanac County, McBane Mill has been standing since the 1800s. It was used for corn, flour, furniture, and coffin making, and included a general store, a blacksmith shop, and a kiln.
Record #:
27585
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In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the area that is now Shenandoah County, Virginia served as a principal migration route from Philadelphia to North Carolina. Trade centers and developers in the region brought together a variety of cultures. This diversity created one of the most interesting American regional styles in decoration and craftsmanship.
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Record #:
27586
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Research by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts has revealed much about the material culture of Germans in piedmont North Carolina, but less is known about their history in South Carolina. The discovery of illuminated manuscripts called fraktur indicate German settlement in the Dutch Fork area, and a mix of religious and cultural influences on art.
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Record #:
27583
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Neoclassical and Empire are two major styles of brass andiron produced in Charleston, South Carolina. These two styles were brought to light through an analysis of Charleston brass founders conducted at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
27572
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The discovery of three groups of chairs with related design and construction characteristics, and with early histories based near the Fredericksburg-Falmouth area of Virginia has prompted further appraisal of chair-making in the region. Each chair features a crest rail, which may be characteristic to Tidewater Virginia down into the Albemarle Sound region of North Carolina.
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Record #:
30558
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Changes in public historical agencies often happen so rapidly and drastically that administrators are not capable of performing an extensive assessment of long term program goals. The goals of a public historical agency should include the re-intermeshing of various specializations, with active efforts to preserve both social and material history.