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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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24 results for "Material culture"
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Record #:
37039
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Abstract:
The author studies the vernacular architectures of western North Carolina tobacco barns from a material folklore perspective. He focuses on the years of active usage and the roles tobacco barns function as in modern society across the region.
Record #:
23836
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The Brady C. Jefcoat Museum in Murfreesboro, North Carolina displays the collection of Brady Jefcoat. There are more than 16,000 items in the collection, some dating back to the Great Depression. Most of the artifacts are old household items like washing machines, radios, and plumbing hardware.
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Record #:
27882
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Abstract:
Evidence found in research files at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina reveals the diverse material culture and impact of cabinetmaking in Columbia and Richland County, Virginia from 1800 to 1860. Columbia’s political and geographic location made it a transition zone for people, goods, and cultures traveling between the Low country to the Piedmont regions.
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Record #:
27877
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Rug is the most frequently listed bed covering in colonial probate documents from the Chesapeake region. Due to the lack of artifact-based evidence, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study to determine the origins, materials, colors, and patterns of bed rugs as well as the extent and duration of their use from the seventeenth to the early nineteenth century.
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Record #:
27865
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Research by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina found new records on the apprenticeship system, trade guilds and material culture in Carolinas. The records are of convicts, indentures, redemptioners, enslaved African American and American Indian labor and apprentices.
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Record #:
27854
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The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with P through S.
Record #:
27855
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with T through Z.
Record #:
27852
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with D through H.
Record #:
27853
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with I through O.
Record #:
27849
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with A through C.
Record #:
27726
Abstract:
Rosewell was the eighteenth century mansion of the Page family in Virginia, but only its ruins remain today. Continuing studies provide insight into the ceremonial and ritualistic workings of Rosewell. Although specific knowledge about Rosewell’s interior is scant, conclusions can be made about the family and their perceptions of themselves through the house’s overall design and furnishings.
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Record #:
27724
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Brass andirons, fenders, and candlesticks have surfaced and reattribute the materials discussed in a 1979 essay. New patterns and features on the items expand the repertoires of the andiron groups. The materials were produced in Charleston, South Carolina and are in collection at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
34468
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This article addresses historic 19th century bottles recovered from Carteret County. Emphasis is placed on bottle form and decorations. Some discussion of glass manufacture and technologies is also included.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 1, January 1992, p12-13, 16
Record #:
27708
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study of 17th, 18th, and early 19th century Charleston estate inventories. Analysis revealed that Neoclassical dining rooms were not designed solely for the purpose of eating. The upper-class used dining rooms to display the wealth of glassware and silver to impress friends and business acquaintances of the owner.
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Record #:
35884
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Abstract:
In addition to works of folklore related materials, the author also included historic site archaeology and restoration, farmhouses, jails, and other public buildings.
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