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24 results for "Material culture"
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Record #:
23836
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The Brady C. Jefcoat Museum in Murfreesboro, North Carolina displays the collection of Brady Jefcoat. There are more than 16,000 items in the collection, some dating back to the Great Depression. Most of the artifacts are old household items like washing machines, radios, and plumbing hardware.
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Record #:
27583
Abstract:
Neoclassical and Empire are two major styles of brass andiron produced in Charleston, South Carolina. These two styles were brought to light through an analysis of Charleston brass founders conducted at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
34468
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This article addresses historic 19th century bottles recovered from Carteret County. Emphasis is placed on bottle form and decorations. Some discussion of glass manufacture and technologies is also included.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 1, January 1992, p12-13, 16
Record #:
27865
Abstract:
Research by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina found new records on the apprenticeship system, trade guilds and material culture in Carolinas. The records are of convicts, indentures, redemptioners, enslaved African American and American Indian labor and apprentices.
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Record #:
27882
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Evidence found in research files at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina reveals the diverse material culture and impact of cabinetmaking in Columbia and Richland County, Virginia from 1800 to 1860. Columbia’s political and geographic location made it a transition zone for people, goods, and cultures traveling between the Low country to the Piedmont regions.
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Record #:
35884
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In addition to works of folklore related materials, the author also included historic site archaeology and restoration, farmhouses, jails, and other public buildings.
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Record #:
27586
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Research by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts has revealed much about the material culture of Germans in piedmont North Carolina, but less is known about their history in South Carolina. The discovery of illuminated manuscripts called fraktur indicate German settlement in the Dutch Fork area, and a mix of religious and cultural influences on art.
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Record #:
27572
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The discovery of three groups of chairs with related design and construction characteristics, and with early histories based near the Fredericksburg-Falmouth area of Virginia has prompted further appraisal of chair-making in the region. Each chair features a crest rail, which may be characteristic to Tidewater Virginia down into the Albemarle Sound region of North Carolina.
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Record #:
27849
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The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with A through C.
Record #:
27852
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Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with D through H.
Record #:
27853
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with I through O.
Record #:
27854
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with P through S.
Record #:
27855
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with T through Z.
Record #:
35834
Abstract:
Located on Cane Creek in Almanac County, McBane Mill has been standing since the 1800s. It was used for corn, flour, furniture, and coffin making, and included a general store, a blacksmith shop, and a kiln.
Record #:
27699
Author(s):
Abstract:
Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina examined the jewelry styles prevalent in the Chesapeake during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century. Portraits of Chesapeake ladies reveal significant information about the most personal aspects of material wealth and culture, and the use of jewelry in economic and social structure.
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