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44 results for "Hurricane Floyd, 1999"
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Record #:
12410
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wienke discusses the effect flooding from Hurricane Floyd had on blue crab, oysters, bay scallop fisheries and the fisherman who harvest them.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2009, p25-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
16913
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hurricane Floyd crossed eastern North Carolina in September 1999, causing the largest disaster in the state's history. The majority of the damage was caused by flooding associated with heavy rainfall rather than by high winds or coastal erosion. There are a number of physical features of eastern North Carolina that contributed to making this flood so severe. When these features/factors come together in a unique way, extreme events such as the flooding from Hurricane Floyd occur.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 7 Issue , 1999, p3-11, map, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
25239
Abstract:
While there were many promises of action to prevent environmental catastrophe like that which followed Hurricane Floyd, the government has been slow to enact policies and the momentum of the effort is slowing down.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 19 Issue 4, Fall 2000, p5, il
Record #:
25236
Author(s):
Abstract:
While the expected backlash from the pollution of Hurricane Floyd didn’t happen, scientists are still waiting for the other shoe to drop as the toxins are still sitting on the bottom of the river. The long-term effects of the Hurricane are still unknown.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 19 Issue 4, Fall 2000, p1, 10, il, por
Record #:
25234
Author(s):
Abstract:
The damage caused by the combination of Hurricane Dennis and Hurricane Floyd taught Eastern North Carolina a lesson about land use. The devastating effects of the storm are given with possible solutions in this detailed analysis of the storm.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Winter 1999, p1, 4-5, il
Record #:
25235
Author(s):
Abstract:
There was astounding damage to the water of the Tar River after Hurricane Floyd hit. The bulk of the pollution came from the hog farms’ waste and has led to new laws on the subject that may or may not do the trick.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Winter 1999, p3, il
Record #:
26022
Author(s):
Abstract:
Researchers from Carolina’s Southern Oral History Program made a documentary of Grifton, a town devastated by Hurricane Floyd in 1999. Residents were interviewed about their recovery and coping experiences.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
28478
Author(s):
Abstract:
The environmental impact of hurricanes Matthew and Floyd are compared. Floyd cost more than 11.3 billion dollars in 2017 dollars, more than triple Matthew’s losses. Floyd destroyed $1.1 billion in crops, livestock, and farm buildings versus $544 million because of Matthew. While the losses from 2016’s Matthew were not as bad as 1999’s Floyd, problems still exist especially concerning the state’s hog industry, water and sewer systems, and poultry industry.
Record #:
31200
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than two years later, Eastern North Carolina communities are still recovering from the flooding and impacts of Hurricane Floyd in 1999. This article discusses the continuing efforts of North Carolina electric cooperatives, how they were able to restore electrical power following the storm, and lessons learned in disaster preparation and relief.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 7, July 2002, p6, il, por
Record #:
31293
Abstract:
Hurricane Floyd hit the North Carolina coast on Wednesday, September 15, and was one of the most costly storms the state has ever experienced. This article discusses how eastern North Carolina communities and electric cooperatives endured the impacts of Hurricane Floyd.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1999, p4-5, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
34305
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s effort to address the devastation resulting from Hurricane Floyd has focused on human health, social needs, and economic recovery. As state planners prepare for long-term response to hurricanes, consideration is being given to stormwater runoff, water quality, watershed development, and urbanization.
Record #:
34364
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina experienced a string of debilitating natural disasters over a five-year period beginning with Hurricane Floyd in 1999, and the response to some of these crises is still ongoing in many places. Government leaders and industries are cooperating to try to fix the policy and planning failures that exacerbated damages. Revised, comprehensive floodplain mapping is one of the preventative actions that emerged as a direct result of Hurricane Floyd.
Record #:
39996
Abstract:
This chronicle of the hurricane that left “the flood of the century” in its wake left behind a deluge of memories. Accompanying figures such as 52 deaths and over 500 million dollars in lost crops were interviews of people from Northeast, Grifton, Tick Bite, Wallace, and New Bern.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Fall 2019, p13-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
40659
Author(s):
Abstract:
Though focusing on the isolating impact of a recent hurricane on Ocracoke, the state's experience with Hurricane Dorian taught the author any area might become solitary in the midst of floodwaters. It also prompted her to pose the question to all North Carolina communities, townships, and neighborhoods: do you have a survival plan in place, in the event of weather-generated isolation from local, regional, and state resources?
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 51 Issue 11, November 2019, p4