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31 results for "Historic buildings"
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Record #:
22220
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Rafael Guastavino was an accomplished Spanish architect when he came to the United States in 1881. His first major work was the Boston Library which made him famous in the East and soon caught the eye of George W. Vanderbilt, who commissioned him in 1890 to build the arches at Biltmore Estate in Asheville. Guastavino had developed and patented the technique, known as the Tile Arch System in 1885. He later built his own retirement home, a twenty-five room structure near Black Mountain. In North Carolina his work is found in Duke Chapel in Durham, the Jefferson Standard Building in Greensboro, the Motley Memorial in Chapel Hill, and Basilica Shrine of St. Mary in Wilmington. He is buried in the crypt of the Basilica of St. Lawrence, Asheville, which was one of his last projects.
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Record #:
23858
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Jazz singer Nina Simone's 1933 childhood home in Tryon will be restored and protected for years to come after a Kansas-based company, Nineteenth-Century restoration, offered to carry out a complete makeover.
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Record #:
24519
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Al Fincher, an artist from Charlotte, dedicated his time to painting historic buildings in each of North Carolina’s 100 counties; his watercolors are presented here.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 2, July 1977, p12-13, 38, il, por
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Record #:
16183
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Courthouses, post offices, and public schools are just a few examples of public buildings financed by the state. Many of these buildings are from the 19th- and early 20th-centuries and preservationists are trying to save these buildings that embody a community and its history.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 29 Issue 1, Fall 1989, p14-18, il
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Record #:
28650
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The Russell School in Durham is one of the few remaining Rosenwald Schools. 5,000 Rosenwald Schools were built for African Americans in the segregated south by Julius Rosenwald, the former president of Sears, Roebuck & Company. Durham’s Helen Rosenwald recently visited the school in Durham and connected with the alumni who attended the school founded by her cousin, Julius Rosenwald. Helen Rosenwald’s story as a Jewish refugee during World War II, the stories of alumni of the Russell School, and the history of the two groups and the school is detailed.
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Record #:
30792
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Making history since 1584, North Carolina's historic buildings and artifacts now draw thousands of visitors each year. From the Orton Plantation in Wilmington to the Southern Branch Philadelphia Mint in Charlotte, North Carolina history provides tourists with vast places to explore.
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Record #:
34588
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The Carteret County Historical Society installed more plaques on historic buildings in Marshallberg than anywhere else in the County. A local teacher in Marshallberg identified many of the historic buildings which aided the society in their task.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 11 Issue 4, Fall 1995, p6
Record #:
34732
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The Hunting Quarters Primitive Baptist Church was first organized in Hunting Quarters Township in 1829. Constructed at Nelson Bay, the Meeting House welcomed members of the Congregation from Portsmouth Island, Cedar Island, Atlantic, and Davis Shore. Following the Civil War, the community relocated to the town of Atlantic. When the building was destroyed in 1918 by a tornado, it was rebuilt further down the road. The congregation continued to meet until the 1960s, however it was a community in decline. In 2006, the Meeting House remained in poor condition. Thanks to efforts from local historians and community members, however, the structure has been repaired and is currently used for history meetings.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p5-6, il
Record #:
35488
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The price for this piece of property in Hamilton can be measured in value, partly because of the Darden Hotel’s speculative illustrious connections with the Civil War. The price tag can be measured also in worth, because of this mandate by city officials: the owner must maintain the historic landmark as a restaurant or inn, not a private residence.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1976, p13-14
Record #:
35777
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The author offered descriptions of restored homes such as Halifax’s 1760 Owens House and Kenanville’s 1800 Liberty Hall. Included was description of events such as the Outer Banks village of Rodanthe’s celebration of little Christmas. From the collection of these holiday happenings, revealed was how the Yuletide season was celebrated in the Tarheel State during its pre and post-Colonial days.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p25-26
Record #:
37166
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With the same theme as another article in this edition, Susan Stafford Kelly's, “For the Love of Fish,” this article profiles North Carolina companies owned by the same families. Among the forty were Joe Sugar’s of St. Paul’s, founded 1916; Winston-Salem’s Quality Oil, established 1937; Raleigh’s Capitol Broadcasting, founded 1937; Morehead City’s El’s Drive-In, established 1959.
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Record #:
35948
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Truth in the saying “a pictures is worth a thousand words” was evident by the photos included by the Sea Chest staff. In this case, the eight homes pictured speak of fishing village life decades distant, yet still standing.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p36-39
Record #:
38237
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Cannon Mills’ company identity became associated with Cabarrus County and Concord. Today, its image reflects non-profit rather than profit based pursuits. Descendants of its founders are investing in higher education institutions across the state like Brevard College and local charities like Cabarrus Red Cross. The family’s hometown, touted as the 11th fastest growing city in North Carolina, shows economic promise in historic buildings such as the renovated Hotel Concord, slated to contain forty apartments and five commercial spaces.
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38250
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Warsaw Presbyterian Church, a town fixture since the late nineteenth century, still creates a sense of community, one extending beyond the sanctuary and the popular Christmas Eve service. The congregation of 120 and self-defined community pastor share a sense of community through activities such as co-running a food pantry and providing plates of food for town newcomers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 7, Dec 2011, p160-162, 164, 166, 168 Periodical Website
Record #:
38266
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The building reopened and named after one of the town’s native sons has functioned as a theater once before, from 1939-2006. Because of this, the present Don Gibson Theater and former State Theater still serves as a memory making site for Shelby citizens, into the third generation.
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