NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


31 results for "Energy conservation"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
28514
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sandy Grove Middle School in Hoke County, North Carolina received a perfect score from Energy Star, which is a rare distinction. Served by Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation, Sandy Grove Middle School has a large photovoltaic solar array, geothermal heating and cooling systems, high efficiency lighting and additional spray foam insulation.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Jan 2017, p6, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
31324
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article explores how one Charlotte organization is trying to take the politics out of climate change. Envision Charlotte promotes energy conservation and sustainable living without using the term “climate change”. Instead they present economically driven approaches to energy conservation, air quality, water usage and waste disposal that may act as partial solution to climate change without making it the topic of conversation.
Record #:
36558
Author(s):
Abstract:
For homeowners, renters, and business owners wanting a healthier and eco-friendly interior environment, Green Gauge, created by the Western North Carolina Building Council, can fulfill both goals. Actions recommended: use energy and water usage wisely, improve indoor air quality, and use sustainable building and landscaping materials. Benefits include lower utility bills, a reduction of carbon footprint, and increased home value.
Record #:
23762
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eco-friendly houses are becoming more popular, but putting a price on them can be difficult for many reasons. The author discusses the challenges with appraising eco-friendly houses.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
28065
Author(s):
Abstract:
Judy Kincaid is the winner of a 2009 Indy Citizen Award for improving her community. As executive director of Clean Energy Durham, Kincaid is helping people of all income levels save energy and money. Kincaid goes door-to-door in Durham’s educating residents on how they can improve sustainability and energy conservation in their homes.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 47, November 2009, p16 Periodical Website
Record #:
30824
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s State Energy Office, in partnership with three universities, offers a program to make factory-built manufactured housing more energy efficient and cost-effective long term. The Upgrade & Save program provides financial incentives to manufactured home retailers to sell ENERGY STAR-labeled homes, and encourages upgrading other manufactured homes to efficient heat pumps.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 2, Feb 2009, p6, il
Full Text:
Record #:
30826
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina consumers who make certain energy-efficiency improvements to their homes may be eligible for tax credits. This article provides guidelines to saving energy and a summary of available tax credits on both the federal and North Carolina levels.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 2, Feb 2009, p10-11, il
Full Text:
Record #:
30867
Author(s):
Abstract:
In recent years, the need for energy storage has grown and sparked new efforts to find the better battery. The North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives and Four County Electric Membership Corporation are road testing plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). These cars use larger, more powerful lithium-ion batteries that can be charged overnight from a standard outlet.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 11, Nov 2009, p12-13, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
23734
Abstract:
Eco-friendly homes are turning up everywhere in Western North Carolina, the main hub being Asheville. Larkin presents a selection of people and their reasons for going green.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
28157
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several Triangle area residents are preparing for life without cheap gasoline and the conveniences that come with it. Stephen and Rebekah Hren founded NC Powerdown. The group meets to discuss the transition to a post-oil economy and to promote the sharing of resources within the community. Lyle Estill is the president of Piedmont Biofuels which produces biodiesel. Earthaven Ecovillage in Black Mountain, NC is a one of the largest of its kind in America and it is a model for an alternative life off and away from America’s consumer society.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 46, November 2008, p12-15 Periodical Website
Record #:
29651
Author(s):
Abstract:
While the energy industry is big for North Carolina, business is important to the energy industry. North Carolina energy helps businesses be more successful by promoting energy efficiency. Energy programs in the state are diverse, from tips and newsletters to planning and distribution systems.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p24-25, por
Record #:
30891
Author(s):
Abstract:
A shortage of electric capacity, huge increases in demand for power, and the cost of climate change are in the making of a perfect storm. North Carolina electric cooperatives discuss plans to reduce carbon dioxide emissions based on technological solutions including energy efficiency, carbon capture and storage, and renewable sources.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p10-11, il
Full Text:
Record #:
30892
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carrboro High School, the newest school in the Orange County school system, teaches students daily about using energy and natural resources carefully. The design and construction of the school buildings emphasize energy conservation, water reduction, high efficiency lighting, and positive indoor air quality.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p14-15, il
Full Text:
Record #:
30981
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the 1970s, North Carolina’s electric cooperatives have been engaged in promoting renewable energy resources such as wind, solar, hydropower, and biomass. Consumers in the state currently benefit from over two percent of their power from hydro resources, as well as small self-contained solar and wind projects. Challenges to renewable energy include transmission, intermittency and the need for advancements in storage technology, as well as high construction costs and delays.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 5, May 2008, p8, il
Full Text:
Record #:
30979
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is looking for renewable energy sources and alternatives to help improve energy efficiency and reduce demand. However, there are significant obstacles to acquire these resources and the costs are expensive. This article discusses current energy sources in North Carolina, environmental conditions, and some of the challenges in energy conservation.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 5, May 2008, p5, por
Full Text: