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14 results for Robinson, Russ
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Record #:
14744
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Abstract:
Sixty years ago Elon College professor, Dr. Thomas Powell, Jr., started selling amoebas and frogs to biology teachers. That humble beginning grew into Burlington-based Carolina Biological Supply Company, a company that produces scientific educational products that include everything from maggots to tarantulas to kits that teach genetic engineering. It is the largest company of its type in the world, employing over 400 people with sales of over $25 million a year.
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Record #:
14743
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Greensboro seeks to create an image that is distinct from Raleigh or Charlotte. To do this, the city has embarked upon its biggest downtown construction boom since the Great Depression of the 1920s. Robinson discusses what is being built where, when, and by whom.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Mar 1985, p33-34, 36, 38, il Periodical Website
Record #:
14752
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A. O. Redding, a High Point craftsman, started Alma Furniture in 1885. In 1921, Charles E. Hayworth, Sr. purchased the company, dropped furniture making, and began specializing in wooden desks and other furniture designed for office and institutional use. Alma is now one of the top three producers of wooden office furniture in the country. Sales in 1984 exceeded $70 million, and the company remains a family-owned business.
Record #:
14875
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J. Edgar Broyhill, II, grandson of the founder of Broyhill Industries, Inc., is president and CEO of Edgar B Furniture Plantation. Located in Clemmons, five-year-old Edgar B is a mail-order company selling middle- and top-line furniture at discount prices. The company targets upper-income customers, and the average order is between $1500 and $2000. Edgar B sold more than $15 million in merchandise in 1984.
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Record #:
14880
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BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine features Charles A. Hayes in its business profile. Hayes is president and chief executive officer of Guilford Mills, a large textile firm headquartered in Greensboro. It is the world's largest producer of warp knit fabric with sales in the last fiscal year of $356 million.
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Record #:
14885
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Hundreds of years ago artists could depend upon patrons of their work to be the nobility and the church. Now a new patron has emerged within the state and across the country -- corporations. Galleries and artists report a growing number of corporations are buying works to enhance the environments of their workers and to build company art collections. Galleries report that purchases can range from $5,000 for a single work to $500,000 for acquisitions for an entire building.
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Record #:
14889
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American Express announced in April 1985 that it will open a regional credit card center near the airport in Greensboro. Completion of the center is scheduled for October 1986, but it is already taking hundreds of calls a week. At full capacity the center will employ 2,000 people. Business and civic leaders indicate that center's economic impact will spread far beyond the number of those employed.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, Mar 1986, p43-44, 46, 49-51, il Periodical Website
Record #:
14903
Author(s):
Abstract:
An economic transition is underway in the Piedmont Triad, which consists of the cities of Greensboro, High Point, and Winston-Salem. While tobacco, textiles, and furniture will remain an important part of the area's economy, the major economic trend for the region is away from a reliance on manufacturing jobs to non-manufacturing ones.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, May 1986, p31-32, 34, 36, 40, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
15041
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Abstract:
Honda Power Equipment and Manufacturing, Inc. is the U.S. branch of the Japanese company's lawnmower-manufacturing division. The company opened the Swepsonville plant in Alamance County in 1984, producing 50 movers a day. When the plant was dedicated in October of that year, production had reached 100 a day. In the summer of 1985, the plant reached full capacity and is now producing 500 movers a day.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 6 Issue 7, July 1986, p34-36, 38, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
15091
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Robert L. Page's hobby was visiting flea markets looking for pieces of china. His hobby grew into his company, Greensboro-based Replacements Ltd., the world's largest supplier of discontinued crystal and china. It has grown from a one-man operation in 1981 to a business employing fifty-five in 1986. Sales are expected to exceed $5 million in 1986. In the same year Page was named North Carolina's Small Business Man of the Year.
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Record #:
15576
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Abstract:
Marvin Coghill is president and chief operating officer of Standard Commercial Tobacco, Co. in Wilson, the world's second largest independent tobacco trading company. Recently the company has added a new venture, the wool market. The company has acquired 2 to 3 percent of the world's wool market, which is significant since no company controls more than 7 percent of the market. Wool sales for the last fiscal year were S235 million and produced $6 million in profit. Standard's tobacco sales were $375 million with $14.5 million in profit.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, Apr 1987, p28-30, 32, 34, por Periodical Website
Record #:
15583
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Abstract:
Hatteras Hammocks was founded seventeen years ago in Greenville by Walter Perkins, a tobacco buyer who started making hammocks in his living room. The company expects to sell around 60,000 in 1987. Today Hatteras is a $6 million business with 150 employees, production lines, and machines. Their best-known competitor is Pawleys Island Hammocks of South Carolina.
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Record #:
14915
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BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine and Arthur Andersen & Company present their annual ranking of the state's top one hundred privately-held companies. Blue Bell, Inc., a Greensboro manufacturer of jeans and other casual and work apparel, replaced McDevitt & Street Co., a Charlotte general contractor, in the number one position for 1986, with McDevitt dropping to second place.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, June 1986, p16-18, 20, 22-26, 28-29, il Periodical Website
Record #:
14870
Abstract:
BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA profiles four key players in the state's construction industry - J. M. Dixon Inc.; Jones Group Inc.; G. Smedes York; and Henry Faison.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 8, Aug 1985, p50-51, 53-54, 56-58, por Periodical Website
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