NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


11 results for Muse, Howard S., Jr
Currently viewing results 1 - 11
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
246
Abstract:
The authors discuss the ownership and the management of forests in North Carolina, and offer suggestions for the improvement of forest policy in the state.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, June 1983, p24-31, il, bibl, f
Full Text:
Record #:
407
Abstract:
Eighty percent of North Carolina's timberland is privately owned and terribly mismanaged.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Fall 1979, p14-15, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
6022
Abstract:
Covered bridges that once spanned waterways from the Coastal Plain to the Blue Ridge have almost disappeared, falling prey to neglect and the ravages of passing time. Muse describes the state's four remaining ones - Pisgah and Skeen's Mill bridges in Randolph County, Bunker Hill bridge near Claremont, Catawba County, and Rascoe's Mill bridge, Bertie County.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Dec 1977, p11-12, 43, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
6555
Abstract:
Duke Forest consists of 8,500 acres and is a delight to naturalists, hikers, and research personnel. The forest is bounded by Durham, Chapel Hill, and Hillsborough. Muse discusses the forest from its beginning in the 1920s under Clarence Korstian, the first dean of the Duke Forestry School, to its present use for research and recreation.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p30-31, il
Record #:
12318
Abstract:
On April 28, 1940, Eleanor Roosevelt visited Carthage, North Carolina to tour the new Municipal Building that had been built by local youths with the aid of the National Youth Administration. Part of the New Deal's Works Progress Administration, the NYA was designed to give financial aid by providing part-time jobs to high school and college students.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 5, Oct 1973, p25-26, il
Full Text:
Record #:
9191
Abstract:
The 1,100-acre James Godwin Forest is the result of an attempt by James L. Goodwin, a wealthy Connecticut resident and Yale Forestry School graduate, to introduce modern forestry methods into the North Carolina Piedmont during the late 1920s. Managed by the School of Forest Resources at North Carolina State University, the forest is one of the state's oldest actively managed tree farms.
Full Text:
Record #:
29259
Abstract:
For many North Carolina homeowners, the use of wood instead of fossil fuels is a simple, old-fashioned, yet innovative way to beat rising energy prices. This article describes various types of woodstoves and the best available woods in North Carolina.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p14-16, por
Record #:
35646
Abstract:
The longleafs left could be found on the James Boyd estate in Southern Pines. Thanks to the preservation of this pine breed, Boyd may be known in NC history for more than his historic novels Drums and Marching On.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p34-35
Record #:
35680
Abstract:
Touted also as the first total, natural habitat zoo, it included animals representing all seven continents, terrestrial or aquatic. What made this zoo possible: its location near Asheboro; financial backers such as the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation; a growing public support base through the Zoological Society; and thirteen zookeepers passionate about their work.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p24-26
Record #:
35690
Abstract:
Wood was espoused as a viable alternative heat source and solution for the energy crisis. As proof that wood was a cut above the rest economically, the author included examples of the best types, such as ash, beech, and dogwood, and the only necessary equipment, a chain saw and axe.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p
Record #:
35893
Abstract:
It was an enlightened response to the energy crisis, educating about an eco-friendly fuel source. Cited were virtues of stoves and types of burners. Observed were good tree types. To remove danger from a daring alternative, provided were books like Using Coal and Wood Burning Stoves Safely and Barnacle Parp’s Chain Saw Guide. As for reasons not prosaic, highlighted were activities generating what he called the “aesthetic charm” of the fireside.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p14-16