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9 results for Hipps, Julie
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Record #:
8079
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New Bern's Christ Episcopal Church burned on January 10, 1871. Parish members rallied behind their rector and rebuilt the church. A variety of memorials were donated, including fourteen stained glass windows that have graced the church since 1875. Hipps discusses three of the windows-the Arete Sitgreaves Ellis window; the Elizabeth Gittig and Samuel Oliver window; and the William N. Hawks window.
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Record #:
8091
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After the Civil War, white and African American physicians, lawyers, educators, business, and religious leaders in New Bern participated in the local economy, society, and politics. By 1910, Jim Crow laws had changed this, and black businesses no longer were located near white businesses. By the 1940s, African American businesses had been concentrated in the Five Points section. Hipps discusses how the civil rights movement changed New Bern educationally and economically.
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Record #:
8106
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A strong building industry existed in New Bern between 1790 and 1840. A cluster of artisans -- free blacks and whites -- dominated the industry there. Hipps discusses the style of the buildings, individuals prominent in the industry, and how slaves were used and paid for their labors. Sometimes blacks and whites were apprenticed and lived in the same building. A list of African American apprentices for 1790-1835 and free black artisans is included. One well-known free black bricklayer and mason was Donum Mumford (Montford).
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Record #:
28073
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Moses Griffin of New Bern signed a will in 1816 allocating his finances toward the development of Griffin’s Free School. His will provided for the education of his nephew, as well as for the housing, nourishment, care, and education of orphans. The legacy continued in the New Bern Graded School and the Moses Griffin Building on the Academy Green.
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Record #:
28079
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The advent of the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad in New Bern in 1858 accelerated the tempo of transportation, thereby stimulating manufacturing, economic progress, and rural development. It generated civic pride, optimism, entrepreneurial ventures, and affluence.
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Record #:
28100
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The Historic Preservation Act of 1966 and the New Bern Preservation Foundation have significantly slowed the pace of demolition, and preserved over five-hundred intact historic buildings dating as far back as the 1700s. While preservation efforts have progressed, there is still doubt whether preservation can boost the economy.
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Record #:
28096
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As the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad began to foster hope for economic revitalization, General Ambrose Burnside and his Union troops invaded eastern North Carolina and captured New Bern. The military deprived the railroad of its former vitality and the railroad became neglected.
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Record #:
28163
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A stained glass window of Christ Church in New Bern serves as a memorial honoring Dr. Isaac Hughes and his family. The Hughes Family gave considerable attention and means to the improvement of New Bern throughout the nineteenth century.
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Record #:
39453
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Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad’s history included its merger in 1870, joining the Eastern North Carolina Dispatch in 1877, the election of James A. Bryan as company president in 1899, its renaming to the Atlantic and North Carolina Company by Richard S. Howland; and Howland’s consolidation of the Atlantic and North Carolina Company with five other railroad companies. The author coincides the multi-railroad company merger with railroads ceding to ships as a major transporting source by the early twentieth century.