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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Heath, Milton S., Jr
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Record #:
480
Abstract:
There exists in North Carolina no comprehensive or systematic law of ground water quality. The author catalogues certain existing laws in order to arrive at the main elements found in singular legislation regarding ground water.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Winter 1987, p39-49, il, f
Record #:
518
Abstract:
Interbasin transfers, or diversions, have had a way of raising the hackles of legislators, officials, and citizens. The author attempts to clarify relevant transfer laws in an effort to reduce misunderstanding and confrontation.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 55 Issue 2, Fall 1989, p34-44
Record #:
2105
Abstract:
Interbasin transfer (IBT), or the movement of water from one river basin to another, can be controversial. Examples include the Randleman Dam and Lake Gaston Pipeline project. The General Assembly recently passed a new IBT statute altering legislation
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 60 Issue 2, Fall 1994, p21-29, il, f
Record #:
5176
Abstract:
Environmental issues were a top priority on the agenda of the 1997 North Carolina General Assembly. Among the areas generating legislation were swine farms, water quality issues, fisheries reform, solid and hazardous wastes, and coastal waterfront development.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
17655
Abstract:
A questionnaire was distributed to farmers, industrial facilities, and others throughout fourteen Piedmont cities. The questionnaire was part of a study to examine adherence to water laws, impediments created by these laws, and the cost to the consumer. Those administering and recording the results of this study hoped to determine a more efficient water legislation plan in the face of technological changes and increased strain on the resource because of growing populations in the region.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 28 Issue 5-6, Mar-Apr 1962, p13-15, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17891
Abstract:
The 1965 General Assembly recommended the Department of Water Resources appoint a committee responsible for studying water use legislation and to report back to the assembly in 1967. Such a report was necessary because of a modern, growing population in the state which also forced new laws to deal with increased demand. Findings from the initial report are included in this piece.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 32 Issue 8, May 1966, p18-19, il
Record #:
17976
Abstract:
Discussion by the 1959 North Carolina General Assembly focused on the new Department of Water Resources Act, watersheds law, motor boat regulation, and protection of the Outer Banks.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 25 Issue 9, June 1959, p22-28
Record #:
18058
Abstract:
This article discusses the public water supply situation in North Carolina as of 1970. Lack of ample sources, small ownership rights, and extreme costs are at the center of the current problems.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 37 Issue 7, Apr 1971, p1-4, 8
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Record #:
18077
Abstract:
In October of 1971, the North Carolina General Assembly convened for an unprecedented session on restructuring higher education in North Carolina. Issues focused on administration and coordination, as well as public education boards.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 38 Issue 3, Nov 1971, p1-5, 19
Subject(s):
Record #:
18124
Abstract:
As early as 1899 the State Board of Health in North Carolina was given some statutory powers over water pollution affecting sources of domestic water supply; state fisheries agencies possessed parallel powers, but both contained important loopholes and funding of state pollution programs was limited. The first strong water pollution control law was enacted in 1951 but some revisions are called for.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 39 Issue 2, Oct 1972, p13-15
Record #:
18168
Abstract:
A drought in 1968 caused officials in the Piedmont to reevaluate water resources, management, and legal precedents for distribution. The author reviews both legislative measures pertaining to water supplies and the organizations responsible in overseeing and enacting these laws from the early 1950s through 1968. This evolution of policy lead to the 1967 General Assembly decision to combine departments in to the Department of Water and Air Resources, an entity entrusted to ensure both the quantity and quality of water distribution.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 35 Issue 3, Nov 1968, p4-8
Record #:
18312
Abstract:
Reviewed are the changes in the General Assembly concerning growth in budget and drastic increase in number of employees. A breakdown of assembly members' occupations and how many recurring members is also included.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 46 Issue 3, Winter 1981, p20-25
Record #:
18343
Abstract:
In 1977, North Carolina joined a growing number of states that have enacted sunset laws; the sunset law is aimed especially at unexamined programs that are rarely re-evaluated by the legislature once the initial stir of interest attending their creation has passed.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Winter 1979, p45-49
Record #:
18364
Abstract:
The North Carolina Coastal Area Management Act (CAMA) was enacted by the 1974 General Assembly as a blueprint for developing land-use plans concerning the coastal area, identifying areas in need of protection, and installing a permit system to guide land development within these critical areas. This article examines the progress of CAMA's administration after the first five years, and provides a brief review of the broader setting of coastal land management.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 45 Issue 4, Spring 1980, p32-37, 44, f
Record #:
18532
Abstract:
Clean air and water acts and devastating incidents like Love Canal and Three Mile Island in the 1970s spotlighted a need for government involvement with the disposal of solid wastes. Presented are comments from five government officials specializing in waste management policy. They discuss legislation and regulation of waste both hazardous and non-hazardous within the state and potential future initiatives to manage waste and protect the state's citizens.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 47 Issue 4, Spring 1982, p12-15, 20
Subject(s):