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8 results for Grant, Cary M
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Record #:
2725
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Workers' Compensation Act, the Americans With Disabilities Act, and the Family Medical Leave Act have distinct purposes. Employers must give careful attention to each when dealing with an employee affected by them.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 61 Issue 2, Fall 1995, p20-32
Record #:
2864
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Workers' Compensation Act, the American's with Disabilities Act, and the Family Medical Leave Act have distinct purposes. Employers must give careful attention to each when dealing with an employee affected by them.
Source:
Record #:
20723
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1994 short session of the NC General Assembly significantly changed the state's workers' compensation law with the enactment of Senate Bill 906. The Bill makes major changes designed to strike a balance between employees' desire to protect their rights to compensation for workplace injuries and employers' goals of reducing lost work days and constantly rising medical costs. This Bulletin summarizes these changes.
Source:
Public Personnel Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7835 .A519), Vol. Issue 2, Jul 1994, p1-5, f
Record #:
20725
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beginning April 6, 1995, employers must comply with a new set of \"final\" rules issued by the U.S. Department of Labor to implement the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). This bulletin provides an overview of some of the major revisions and clarifications.
Source:
Public Personnel Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7835 .A519), Vol. Issue 4, Apr 1995, p1-5, f
Record #:
20737
Author(s):
Abstract:
These three statutes have distinct purposes; however, despite this, all three laws can apply to the same case simultaneously. Workers' Compensation was created to provide prompt, sure, and reasonable income and benefits on a no-fault-basis to people injured on the job. The Americans with Disabilities Act was designed to prevent employment discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. The Family and Medical Leave Act was passed to protect the employment of workers who must take time off to care for their own medical needs or the needs of family members. This bulletin includes a chart that provides a comparative analysis of some of the keys provisions of these three acts.
Source:
Public Personnel Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7835 .A519), Vol. Issue 9, May 1996, p1-4, f
Record #:
20739
Author(s):
Abstract:
What predismissal hearing procedures must a government employer follow before firing an employee who has a constitutionally protected property interest in continued employment? In 1985 the U.S. Supreme Court considered this question in Cleveland Board of Education v. Loudermill. This bulletin discusses the Loudermill decision, examines the NC State Personnel Commission's regulations in implementing the Loudermill decision, surveys lower court decisions interpreting Loudermill, and reviews the requirements of an adequate predismissal hearing.
Source:
Public Personnel Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7835 .A519), Vol. Issue 1, June 1994, p1-10, f
Record #:
20734
Author(s):
Abstract:
A number of significant bills dealing with personnel matters were introduced into the 1995 NC General Assembly, but legislators enacted only a few of them into law. These changes and other changes in the law governing the public personnel function at the state and local level are discussed in the bulletin.
Source:
Record #:
28730
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1985 case, Cleveland Board of Education v. Loudermill, held that a government employer must give an employee who possesses a right in continued public employment a pretermination hearing. This bulletin discusses the case and explains its applicability to North Carolina local governments.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 56, Apr 1994, p1-7, f