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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Bolen, Eric G
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Record #:
11959
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Bird banding provides information on the life history and migratory habits of many bird species. Frederick C. Lincoln organized the modern bird banding program in 1920. Bolen discusses bands, what information is gleaned from bird banding, and setting seasons.
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Record #:
2892
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John Bartram, botanist to King George III, and his son William, were eminent naturalists who traveled the Carolinas and the Southeast collecting botanical specimens. William's 1791 book, TRAVELS, is considered a landmark of early botanical study.
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Record #:
3995
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John Lawson's early exploration of the Carolinas in 1701 resulted in a book, THE HISTORY OF THE CAROLINAS, that is studied even today for its sharp observations on natural life and Indian customs. He was killed by Indians on 1711 while on another expedition.
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Record #:
8233
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Bolen reviews the lives and philosophies of three conservation giants whose ideas can be tied to the conservation of endangered species and help answer the question: Why should we care? The conservationists are John Muir (1838-1914); Gifford Pinchot (1865-1946); and Aldo Leopold (1887-1948).
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Record #:
9635
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Bolen discusses the life and activities of political cartoonist and conservationist Jay N. “Ding” Darling. Although his cartoons were critical of the New Deal, President Roosevelt appointed him head of the Bureau of Biological Survey, the forerunner of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It was Darling's promotion in 1934 of the Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp that secured his legacy. The first stamp sold for $1 and raised $635,000 for conservation efforts. Since then this stamp program has generated over $700 million for conservation.
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Record #:
10919
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Wildlife disease was once considered an \"act of God,\" but researchers have now learned how epidemics spread within animal populations. With this information wildlife managers can take steps to stop these diseases.
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Record #:
12099
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In the 19th-century birds colliding with lighthouses died in significant numbers, sometimes as high as three hundred in a single night. Bolen discusses how C.H. Merriam's work on this problem eventually led to the formation of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
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