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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Wildlife diseases
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Record #:
26463
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Wildlife diseases most often appear in a population when the population level gets high and they become more susceptible to infections and infestations. In North Carolina, rabies in wildlife is rare but possible. Outdoor recreationists and hunters should also be aware of Lyme disease, rabbit fever, and epizootic hemorrhagic disease.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 39 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1992, p14-15, il
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Record #:
26557
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In North Carolina, wildlife can carry diseases such as rabies, tularemia, and Lyme disease. There are no easy solutions to dealing with wildlife diseases, but we can reduce the impacts on wildlife in some cases by actively managing the habitat and populations.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1989, p7
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Record #:
5816
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Chronic wasting disease is an untreatable, incurable neurological disease of deer, elk, and related animals. There are no cases of CWD in North Carolina at present. Pipkin discusses what this disease could mean to the state's $600 million hunting economy and new rules from the North Carolina Wildlife Commission to help prevent the introduction of the disease into North Carolina.
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Record #:
10919
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Wildlife disease was once considered an \"act of God,\" but researchers have now learned how epidemics spread within animal populations. With this information wildlife managers can take steps to stop these diseases.
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Record #:
21088
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This article is a reprint from Fair Chase Magazine, Summer 2013. Kirchgessner's answer to the question is short and simple--always wear protective gloves when handling dead wildlife, animal or fowl. She also describes some of the diseases that can be transferred to humans, such as tuberculosis, Q Fever, and brucellosis.
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