NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for "Wodek, Suzanne"
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
41259
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Carolina Pink, or /Silene caroliniana/, is a North Carolina native wildflower that thrives as ground cover in most settings.
Source:
Record #:
42620
Author(s):
Abstract:
The perennial Goat’s Beard, also known as buck’s-beard and bride’s feathers, thrives in damp environments and was used by Native Americans for healing purposes.
Source:
Laurel of Asheville (NoCar F 264 A8 L28), Vol. 15 Issue 6, June 2018, p76
Record #:
42631
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lizard’s Tail is a perennial flower that thrives in wet areas. Toxic to mammals, it provides good ground coverage for smaller animals.
Source:
Laurel of Asheville (NoCar F 264 A8 L28), Vol. 15 Issue 7, July 2018, p72
Record #:
42601
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lousewort, named for the misconstrued belief that it infests livestock with lice, is a self-seeding plant that has been used to feed animals and was believed that the root was a love charm.
Source:
Laurel of Asheville (NoCar F 264 A8 L28), Vol. 15 Issue 5, May 2018, p34
Subject(s):
Record #:
29869
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bugbane or black cohosh is a native North Carolina perennial that is easily grown in organically rich and moist soil. The common name of bugbane is a reference to the insect repellent smell the plant gives off, and cohosh comes from an Algonquian word meaning rough. The plant is deer and rabbit resistant, and its flowers provide both nectar and pollen to insects.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
28539
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Wild Senna is a plant with a rich history. The plant was used by Native Americans for external skin problems and to treat fevers. It is also used as a laxative and was popular in 19th-century gardens. How to grow the plant, the beneficial pollinators and birds it attracts, and its natural history are explored.
Record #:
26922
Author(s):
Abstract:
The bald cypress tree is often found near swamps, wetlands, and rivers. It is a common and popular tree in North Carolina and throughout the south, not only for its foliage, but also for its ability to soak up flood waters and prevent erosion. Bald cypresses can be found in the wild and in arboretums such as the Asheville Botanical Gardens.
Full Text:
Record #:
40706
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Quaking Aspen is a common tree across much of North America; besides its aesthetic qualities, it is also commonly used to make building materials, furniture, and paper.
Source:
Laurel of Asheville (NoCar F 264 A8 L28), Vol. 14 Issue 10, , p105