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51 results for "Wilson, Jim"
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Record #:
23071
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Experienced fly fisherman, Jim Wilson, discusses the history of fly-fishing for bass in North Carolina. He then offers details about fly-fishing at Phelps Lake in Washington and Tyrrell counties, the second largest natural lake in North Carolina.
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Record #:
24496
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Fly-fishing has long been a popular pastime in North Carolina, particularly in the mountains. The history of the western North Carolina sport dates back to the nineteenth century.
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22359
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Wilson pays tribute to Jack Dermid, a famous wildlife photographer whose works appeared many times in Wildlife in North Carolina and other publications
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13945
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In the late 19th century, fish were declining in North Carolina's rivers and streams. In attempting to provide food for the people, some of whom were still dealing with the effects of Reconstruction, the state's first fish commission (1877-1885) embarked on a plan of restocking, species introduction, and artificial propagation. Wilson discusses the results of their efforts.
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Record #:
13946
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The goal of North Carolina's first fish commission was to provide more fish for the state's people. The commission embarked on a program of stocking native fish and to introduce other species that would survive and increase. Rainbow trout and carp were two of the most successful introductions.
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Record #:
14092
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In part three of a three-part series, Wilson recounts the rise of the modern fish hatchery system in North Carolina. The state has a long history of artificial fish propagation dating back to 1877. The modern period began in 1925 when the North Carolina General Assembly appropriated $500,000 to build five new hatcheries around the state.
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Record #:
13867
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White-nose syndrome has killed hundreds of thousands of bats in the eastern United States. The disease has recently been found in three areas in the state - a retired Avery County mine, a cave at Grandfather Mountain State Park, and Yancey County.
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Record #:
14012
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Richard Clifton's painting of a pair of Canadian geese standing in a pasture was chosen as the 2011 North Carolina Waterfowl Conservation Stamp and Print. Clifton is a Delaware artist. Over thirty wildlife artists from nineteen states and Mexico submitted entries in the competition.
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Record #:
13962
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In 1878, Stephen Worth, first superintendent of North Carolina's fish commission, set off to procure brook trout brood stock for the state's beginning hatchery operations. Using excerpts from Worth's report, Wilson describes the effort to accomplish the mission.
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Record #:
16816
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The NC Wildlife Federation named Captain Jon Evans its Wildlife Enforcement Officer of the year 2011. He is a fifteen years veteran of the NC Wildlife Resources Commission and was recognized for his work while stationed as a sergeant in Alamance County. Al Kittredge is a longtime volunteer at the Commission's fishing education center in Fayetteville and received the Wildlife Volunteer of the Year 2011 from the federation.
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Record #:
15309
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Gopher frogs were once common in the lower Coastal Plain and the Sandhills, but loss of habitat has reduced their number. Using one of the few remaining wild populations, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher are partnering to raise gopher frogs for restoration.
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Record #:
12098
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The rivers and streams in the mountains of North Carolina are well-stocked with trout and attract fishermen from all parts of the state and country. A recent study conducted in 2008 by Responsive Management and Southwick Associates indicates the state derives a significant economic benefit from these angling activities.
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Record #:
19274
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Boaters in North Carolina now have easier access to state waters given the productivity of N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission's Division of Engineering Services. The group has been renovating, replacing, and building Boating Access Areas (BAA) from the mountains to the coast.
Record #:
19270
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Although a time-consuming recipe, Brunswick Stew has become a staple and cultural icon of eastern North Carolina. Recipe included.
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Record #:
19268
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The Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center has recently filed suit against the State of North Carolina to stop the authorization of gill net fishing which is a violation of the Endangered Species Act (ESA).
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