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5 results for Bats--Diseases
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Record #:
16293
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Abstract:
There are thirteen species of bats living in Western North Carolina. Some are migratory bats; others are cave bats. It is the cave bat that concerns scientists most because many of them are afflicted with a mysterious ailment called the white-nose syndrome. The disease has already killed hundreds of thousands of bats in the eastern part of the United States. The disease was first discovered in Albany, NY, in 2006. Scientists in the state are searching for an answer to the disease using the North Carolina Bat Acoustic Monitoring Program.
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Record #:
21068
Author(s):
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White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a pathogen associated with a cold-loving fungus that has a 90 to 100 percent fatality rate when it has occurred in northeastern bat populations. The disease was first discovered in the state during the winter of 2010-2011 in nine western counties. The bat populations in eastern North Carolina are little-researched. Lisa Gatens, Curator of Mammals at the NC Museum of Natural Science, and her team are researching bats in the Hoffman Forest to determine if migrating mountain bats have brought WNS with them, and if not, to determine if coastal bats could be used to repopulate the hard hit counties.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Fall 2013, p6-7, il
Record #:
19280
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North Carolina wildlife biologists are keeping an eye on the state's bat populations and preparing for the possible arrival of a fungus associated with a deadly bat disease.
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Record #:
13867
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White-nose syndrome has killed hundreds of thousands of bats in the eastern United States. The disease has recently been found in three areas in the state - a retired Avery County mine, a cave at Grandfather Mountain State Park, and Yancey County.
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Record #:
20295
Author(s):
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The white-nose syndrome continues to decimate bat populations in western North Carolina, with seven counties affected by the disease. It does not affect people, but the bats are hard hit. For example, over the past two years in retired mine located in Avery County, a bat population of 1,000 dropped to 65, and in a mine in Haywood County a population of 4,000 dropped to 250 in one year.
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