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52 results for "Williams, Robert L"
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Record #:
7039
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Abstract:
Williams describes an incident of World War II having a North Carolina connection. On May 11, 1942, off the North Carolina coast, the German submarine U-558 sank HMS Bedfordshire, a British naval ship on submarine patrol. All thirty-seven British sailors were killed. Days later four bodies from the ship washed up on Ocracoke Island. Residents buried the four in a small plot. Later the United States ceded the land to England in perpetuity for one dollar. Each May memorial services are held there by military representatives from Canada, England, and the United States.
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Record #:
9290
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Faced with huge building costs, Keith and Vicki Lambert of Lucia built their home themselves using recycled parts of an old mill. They salvaged several stained glass windows from an old church. All told, the house cost the couple roughly $10,000 to complete. Keith, who is chairman of the Art Department at Gaston College, built the house in his spare time and designed the structure himself.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 8, Jan 1980, p18-20, il
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Record #:
4344
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Crowders Mountain State Park in Gaston County is an example of what concerned citizens can do when a natural resource is threatened. There was a possibility in the 1970s that the 1,625-foot Crowders Mountain would be strip-mined. Local citizens responded to the threat by convincing the state to accept the peak as a state park. Funds were approved, and in October 1974, the park became a reality.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 8, Jan 1991, p36-38, il
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Record #:
8698
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At age ten, Reverend Charles Keyes of Hickory discovered the true meaning of Christmas. Several of his friends had received nothing for Christmas, and Charles bought them candy and chewing gum. He began delivering mini-sermons at the age of four, becoming known as The Parson in later years. These days, he plays Santa Claus to the mountain people of five states, delivering tractor-trailer loads of clothes, food, and toys in the early part of December each year. The Parson also opened Camp Joy in Hickory, a summer camp where underprivileged children come for a week and are taken on a shopping spree at the week's end.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 7, Dec 1981, p16-18, 29, il
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Record #:
8585
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Every year Cleveland County's smallest town, Belwood, hosts its Heritage Day celebration. Residents dress in 18th-century clothing, travel by horse to the community church where they have a town picnic and celebration. Belwood almost disappeared when the town lost its post office, businesses, and local schools. Local citizens, however, bought the old schoolhouse and teacherage from the county, preventing the demolition of the buildings. The State of North Carolina officially recognized Belwood as a town in 1978, thus ensuring that the town will not disappear.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 4, Sept 1983, p16-17, por
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Record #:
7889
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Sugar Hill, a suburb of Fallston, is known for its annual Easter egg fight. Participants bring anywhere from 6 dozen hard-boiled eggs to 125 dozen, sometimes more. A fight commences when one person taps his or her egg against another person's egg. When one end of an egg is cracked, it is turned over, and another attack begins. A winner is declared when both ends of a competitor's egg are cracked. The winner keeps the loser's egg and both of them move on to the next fight.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987, p10-11,52, il
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Record #:
8826
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Twelve miles south of Mount Pisgah on the Blueridge Parkway, Graveyard Fields is home to some of the finest scenery in the country. On Labor Day, the opening of blueberry season is celebrated here, and dedicated pickers are known to camp out for days at a time. Although wild blueberries grow all over the state, Graveyard Fields draws a crowd because of its breathtaking views.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p20-21, 67, il
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Record #:
6062
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North Carolina has some of the highest, most unusual, and picturesque waterfalls in the eastern United States. Almost 100 are found in the western counties in a triangle stretching from Linville to Brevard to Franklin. Williams describes a number of them, including Hickory Nut Falls, Horse Pasture, Linville Falls, and Dry Falls.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Dec 1977, p19-21, 40-41, il
Record #:
9572
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Abstract:
Before commercialized soap, people made do with homemade lye soap. Williams describes the necessary ingredients and the soap making process.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 10, Oct 1984, p20-21, il
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Record #:
9242
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Knobby, Cleveland County's smaller version of Big Foot, is spotted every year in early December. Knobby is non-violent and there are many speculations as to what he really is. Recently, a movie company has decided to produce a film about the monster, bringing national recognition to Cleveland County.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979, p16-18, il
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Record #:
7746
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Long before the days of million dollar contracts, press agents, and television coverage, baseball was played for fun at East Monbo Park. The park was located in Iredell County between Statesville and Mooresville near a cotton mill in the early part of the 20th-century. Workers were permitted to watch the games, which were played at five o'clock in the afternoon during the week and one o'clock on Saturdays as long as someone stayed behind to keep an eye on the machines. By 1986, the park was completely under Lake Norman, but the memory of the terrific baseball played there will live on.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p7, 37
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Record #:
8506
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Watermelons are coveted items on a hot summer day. A great problem with watermelons is that they can grow only during the summer and early fall. There is a way, however, that ensures that you can enjoy this summer fruit year round - dehydration. During the summer you can take a ripe watermelon and dehydrate slices in an oven or in the sun. Dehydrated watermelon tastes especially sweet because the fruit's natural sugars are concentrated after the water is removed. The watermelon rind can be pickled, too, thus enabling the entire watermelon to be enjoyed year round.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p18-19, por
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Record #:
2787
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The state's western waterfalls are some of its most spectacular scenery. Whitewater Falls, at 413 feet, located along the Jackson/Transylvania county line, is the highest one east of the Mississippi River, and Dry Falls has one of the most unusual names.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 11, Apr 1988, p14-16, il
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Record #:
7869
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A group of children called Junkies lived in the two-block section of Seventh Eighth streets in Statesville in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Every Friday, the Junkies assembled at the junkyard on Seventh Street and the gully on Eighth Street to gather scraps of metal from old automobiles. Even if the Junkies received only a dime for all of their hard work, they were pleased because it was enough to get them into the Crescent Movie House, which featured western films.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 8, Jan 1987, p16-17,27, il
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Record #:
35806
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A sport gaining ground in a state known for its many mountains was rock climbing. Contributing to its rise in popularity (over 4500 climbers reported), were places to climb such as Hanging Rock State Park, Looking Glass Rock, Linville Gorge, and Stone Mountain State Park. Concluding the article were tips to make climbs full of thrills, and minus the chills and spills.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p33, 67