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44 results for "Sadler, W. J"
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Record #:
13777
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Hammers and saw, brick and concrete, drawing boards and slide rules are winning the battle for equality in the African American education in North Carolina, although segregation controversies have been dominating the headlines.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 46, Apr 1952, p3-5, f
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Record #:
13590
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Dr. Delia Dixon Carroll was not only an outstanding figure in the medical world of North Carolina for many years, but she also was interested in civic affairs, social reform, and politics.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 3, June 1951, p3, 20
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Record #:
14010
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The hosiery mills in North Carolina during produced 780,000,000 pairs of stockings in the past year. The industry has had a remarkable growth since its beginning in the state about 60 years ago.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 52, May 1951, p7, 29, f
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Record #:
14008
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Approaching its 100th anniversary, Wrightsville Beach as seen many changes since 1852, when slaves erected the first building there.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 50, May 1951, p8-9, f
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Record #:
15496
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The heaviest snowfalls registered by the United States Weather Bureau at Raleigh occurred in 1899 and 1927. In both instances the snow was eighteen inches deep. In 1899, the snow storm occurred on February 13th and 14th, the temperature dropping to two degrees below zero. The highest temperature ever recorded at Raleigh was during July 1887 and August 1932, each occasion reaching 103 degrees.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 38, Feb 1936, p5, 22, f
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Record #:
15855
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Edward Dudley of New Hanover County was the first North Carolina Governor to be elected by popular vote. Davie County was formed during his administration and Davidson College established. Like his predecessors he fought for public education and sent to the legislature proposals including the establishment of free schools in every county. Although the legislature was resistant, Dudley is given credit for doing more for public education than any previous governor.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 32, Jan 1936, p8
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Record #:
15862
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Thomas Bragg, a member of the prominent Bragg family of Warren County, served two terms as Governor, assuming office on January 1, 1855. He served during the rather hectic period leading up to the Civil War and was a voice for calm in the state. Education improved during his term, as did transportation facilities, especially railroads, and rivers cleared for navigation. Historians accord him a high place in the state's public life, and his administration was considered among the best in the state's history.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 37, Feb 1936, p6
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Record #:
15861
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Whig Party power in the state declined with the 1850 election for Governor of David Reid, a Democrat. He was elected to a second term but stepped down after one year to become a United States Senator. Three new counties were created during his term as Governor. His administration also saw the advancement of public education; manufacturing developing; new road construction, especially of the plank variety; and the growth of transportation companies both on land and water.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 36, Feb 1936, p6
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Record #:
15874
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Zebulon Baird Vance was North Carolina's famous wartime governor, 1862-1865. Previously he had commanded the 26th Regiment North Carolina Troops in battles at New Bern and around Richmond. He was humiliated at war's end when Federal troops captured and carried him to a prison in Washington, D.C., where he was held for a considerable time. Vance triumphed, however, when he was again elected Governor and later a very popular U.S. Senator.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 40, Feb 1936, p6
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Record #:
15888
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W.W. Holden of Wake County was a printer, publisher and editor of the North Carolina Standard, politician, governor, and perhaps the most controversial figure in the state during Reconstruction. He was beset by many of the problems of the post-war era and the General Assembly finally impeached and removed him from office.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 41, Mar 1936, p10
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Record #:
15892
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Jonathan Worth was the state's first Governor under Reconstruction. He was opposed to secession, but once the decision was made he was a strong supporter of the Confederacy. Although he labored valiantly for the state and its citizens, Federal troops removed him from office in 1868.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 42, Mar 1936, p10
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Record #:
15889
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Iden describes the gardens on the Wake Forest campus and around town. Wake Forest College, founded in 1834, was located at this time in Wake County. Dr. Samuel Wait, the first college president, planted the first trees, many of which remain to this day.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 41, Mar 1936, p11, 30, il
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Record #:
15745
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George Burrington was the 18th and 20th governor of North Carolina and had the unique distinction of being the proprietary and royal governor of the state. He was ousted from office on both occasions; however, he had his good qualities, especially in knowing the condition and needs of the colony better than any governor who had ruled before him and in supporting religious tolerance. His declining years were poverty stricken and his body was found in a London canal in 1759.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 6, July 1935, p6
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Record #:
15747
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Gabriel Johnston, royal governor of North Carolina, served the longest tenure of any governor--eighteen years. He followed the unpopular George Burrington and heartily welcomed by the colonists. During his time in office the population grew from 40,000 to over 90,000. However, like his predecessors, enforcing edicts of the Crown brought conflict with the citizenry.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1935, p6
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Record #:
15739
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Edward Hyde was the first governor of the colony of North Carolina. His administration was one of the most disastrous the colonists had been called upon to endure in the New World. A revolt led by the former governor Thomas Cary and the Tuscarora Indian War filled his brief two year term with turmoil and violence.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 1, June 1935, p6
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