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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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39 results for "Lee, David S."
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22358
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There are over 700 plants in North America that are known to toxic to people and animals, and poison ivy is but one of them. Lee covers how the poison works, how a person can get poison ivy, what to do if a person gets it, and what is the best way to avoid getting it.
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22392
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In a unique approach to an article on birds, Lee takes a look at Shakespeare's plays and how he used birds \"to enhance his thoughts regarding superstition, tradition, the human spirit, and the beauty of nature.\" His use of birds far exceeded any of his contemporaries, either playwrights or authors. There are sixty-four kinds of birds mentioned in his combined works and they appear over six hundred times. About fifty of the birds are known to people living in the Eastern US.
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16928
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The state's native cacti are two species of prickly pear. The first is the devil's-tongue, and while it occurs throughout the state, it is most common in the Coastal Plain and Sandhills. The second is the devil's-joint which is restricted to coastal sand dunes and the pinewoods of the state's southern coastal counties.
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Record #:
13858
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Ugly and ill-tempered, snapping turtles are not the most pleasant members of turtle society, yet they are an important part of aquatic communities.
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Record #:
16813
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When Lee's grandfather Julian Weatherbee died in the mid-1970s, he inherited his old rolltop desk. His grandfather had attended the Biltmore Forest School in 1908 and spent most of his career as a forester in the state of Washington. Inside the desk Lee found a treasure trove of his grandfather's material from the school--class and field notebooks, information about birds and wildlife, drawings, and mathematical calculations which provided him a view of life at the forestry school.
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Record #:
11335
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Is it better to have a well-manicured lawn around a house, or one that remains in its natural state? Lee discusses the benefits of letting a yard go \"green\" and revert to its natural state. For example, a natural yard eliminates chemical and poison use, and also reduces use of water, thereby promoting conservation of resources.
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Record #:
8053
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Lee describes his attempt to create a small but virtually self-sustaining stand of longleaf pine that will support many species of longleaf dependent birds and terrestrial animals. The longleaf restoration is part of a larger effort to restore a 130-acre tract of land that Lee and his wife own in Bladen County to make it more favorable to native wildlife.
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Record #:
7195
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Most of the world's wild Venus's flytraps are located within a seventy-five-mile radius of Wilmington, North Carolina. There the flytraps find the necessary ingredients for survival -- damp, acidic soils in open-canopy forests or on the edges of pocosins. Of the more than 450 carnivorous plants in the world, North Carolina's flytrap has the distinction of being the first to be recognized by science for its ability to capture insects. Colonial governor Arthur Dobbs wrote about the plant in 1760. Other writers on the plant have included Charles Darwin and botanist B.W. Wells.
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Record #:
6656
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North Carolina has extensive coastal estuaries and wetland habitats. Because of this, an impressive array of herons, bitterns, and ibises make their homes there. Lee discusses nesting habits, characteristic feeding behaviors, and seasonal occurrences of these birds.
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Record #:
6740
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North Carolina has extensive coastal estuaries and wetland habitats. Because of this, an impressive array of herons, bitterns, and ibises make their homes there. Seventeen types of waders have been documented in the state. In Part Two of this series, Lee discusses nesting habits, characteristic feeding behaviors, and seasonal occurrences of another six of these birds.
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Record #:
5849
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The doodlebug has a name that implies an idler; however, this insect is actually a patient, skillful hunter-trapper. Lee provides a close-up view of the creature's habits.
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Record #:
5241
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The American alligator is North Carolina's largest reptile and can weigh up to 600 pounds and measure 12 feet. The state is the northern limit of their range, but they are not numerous here and live mostly on the outer Coastal Plain. Lee describes these creatures and how they live.
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4741
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Migrating hawks know by instinct when to start, where to go, and how to get there. Each fall they follow well- established routes across North Carolina's mountains and coasts. Lee describes watching hawk migrations over the Outer Banks and lists sites along the coasts and in the mountains where the hawks may be viewed.
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Record #:
4591
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Not all birds built nests in trees or bushes. Many are satisfied with a hole in a tree trunk. Holes have advantages. They offer more protection from predators, more shelter from the weather, and building skills are not required. Among cavity- dwelling birds are the kestrel, wood duck, belted king fisher, common flicker, and various songbirds.
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Record #:
4692
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In the mid-1970s, the red-shouldered hawk was endangered in the state, having experienced a 65 to 74 percent drop in population the previous twenty years. By the year 2000, recovering bottomland hardwood forests again provide suitable habitats, and the species population is again stable. Lee describes the hawk's habitat, food, and nesting habits.
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