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38 results for "Finger, Bill"
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Record #:
3543
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Agriculture and manufacturing powered the state's economy for decades. Now, at the start of the twenty-first century, the state is moving toward a mixed economy in which family farms decline and service, trade, and government are major job providers.
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316
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The Job Training Partnership Act, The Human Resources Development Program, and Workfare are three jobs programs in North Carolina.
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Record #:
24374
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Steve Shorkey works at NCNB and discussed various work-family policies, including a new two-week paternity leave for men.
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330
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North Carolina is tangled in a bureaucratic nightmare regarding environmental agencies. The sheer number of such agencies and the occurrence of interagency overlap are leading legislators to call for consolidation or realignment.
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Record #:
328
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As the population grows, water supply needs increase as do the sources of pollution. The challenge of protecting water quality and ensuring an adequate water supply must be accepted and acted upon by the state.
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Record #:
324
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Finger presents some possibilities and considerations concerning the creation of a state Environmental Index.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 11 Issue 1, Oct 1988, p2-28, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
26981
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Seven years ago, Bill and Georgia Finger adopted two children to raise in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. They experienced a long and emotional adoption process while dealing with their difficult news of infertility. The Fingers overcame their hurdles and now have two daughters as part of their family.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 7, Apr 7-20 1988, p18-22, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
338
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The state government funds three major community-based programs for adult criminal offenders: community penalties, intensive probation and parole, and community service. Each program went through a distinct evolution and faces different prospects for the future.
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Record #:
332
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The North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has completed its first ten years.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Oct 1987, p27-59, il, por, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
24402
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This article presents Republican Jim Martin and Democratic Lt. Gov. Bob Jordan’s stances on economic development in the context of their possible run for governor next year.
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336
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In North Carolina the public has the right to see almost any government record because of a broadly worded \"public record\" law, which gives rise to recurring problems.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, June 1987, p2-13, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
294
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North Carolina is moving toward a dual economy, characterized by booming urban centers and depressed rural areas. The state is striving for economic development that will assist in both areas and address the needs of each.
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295
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This article includes a comprehensive list of all state programs affecting economic development, with expenditure figures and agency responsibilities.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 8 Issue 3-4, Apr 1986, p22-35, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
14884
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Contracting services formerly performed by governments, such as garbage collecting and maintaining highway rest areas, have the potential to save funds and increase accountability and efficiency. Recent budget constraints have prompted a debate within the state on whether state and local governments should move in this direction. Finger discusses how privatization could affect state and local services, including refuse collection, water and sewer systems, state art museum and symphony, hospitals, and prisons.
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