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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for "Ellis, Harry"
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Record #:
2533
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The state has four distinct seasons, each with its own unique beauty and weather, as profiled in this pictorial essay.
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Record #:
2896
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Although usually less than six acres in size, mountain bogs support an uncommon collection of plants, including lady slippers and cinnamon ferns, and animals like wood frogs and crab spiders.
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Record #:
3282
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In the southern Appalachians, there are over 200 treeless mountain balds that include two types: heath and grass. Grass balds are home to over 300 species of flowering plants.
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Record #:
3856
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Twenty-seven species of crayfish with colors from drab brown to bright red live in the state's marshes, streams, and other wet areas. They are both predator and preyed upon and are a fascinating creature to biologists and small boys.
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Record #:
4598
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Why are so few dead creatures - mice, shrews, moles, birds, chipmunks, and others - not seen in the woodlands? The answer is the burying beetle, or more formally, Nictophores tomentosus. When the sun goes down, these beetles go to work, locating and burying the dead. Creatures the size of a mouse can be buried in two to three hours. Pollution is eliminated, and raw materials return to the soil to nourish plant growth. Nineteen species of beetles work in North Carolina.
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Record #:
4709
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The spider is one of mankind's most beneficial creatures, but its appearance is often frightening to those it helps. Around 3,000 species of spiders live in North America, and 1,500 of them make their home in North Carolina. Ellis describes a number of the spiders and their web building and hunting techniques.
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Record #:
4594
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North America has more species of salamanders, 110, than any other place in the world. The southern Appalachians are famous worldwide for their salamanders that have lived there millions of years. At least 34 species have been identified there. Ellis describes the variations in the salamanders and discusses how geography played a part in their evolutionary development.
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