NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 81 Issue 4, July/Aug 2017
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
28769
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wildfire plays an important role in North Carolina’s ecology. Fires remove plant litter and return nutrients to the soil stimulating new plant growth, expose food sources, and remove layers of forest litter so seeds can grow, increase light to the forest floor, maintain open grassy areas, and help create and maintain a diversity of forest structure and composition. Fire is an important part of nature’s cycle and one of nature’s ways of recycling. The relationship between fire and the environment in North Carolina is detailed.
Record #:
28766
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mike Zlotnicki has a tradition of clamming with his family and friends every year on their summer vacation. Zlotnicki describes their latest trip and the events that occur. Ethical questions about fishing and hunting are raised and discussed in the essay. Also discussed is the importance of environmental education to preserve these family traditions.
Record #:
28765
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bald eagles are alive and well again in North Carolina. The status of bald eagles is one of the great conservation success stories. The conservation of the bird in the state is detailed including how the conservation started, how the population was restored, how the eagles are tracked, and how citizens can view them in nature.
Record #:
28767
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is home to a number of pitcher plant species. The purple pitcher plant, the yellow pitcher plant, the red pitcher plant, the hooded pitcher plant, the mountain sweet pitcher plant, and the green pitcher plant all call North Carolina home. The plants are fragile as their habitat has been largely destroyed. The future of the species, the insects and animals who live and depend on the plants, and stories about the plants are described.
Record #:
28768
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bluegill, pumpkinseed, and other panfish frequently bite using homemade flies. The author and his friend Ken Bicknell discuss fishing for panfish in the coastal creeks in coastal North Carolina. Tips and stories about fishing are told.