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18 results for We the People of North Carolina Vol. 14 Issue 6, November 1956
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Record #:
30637
Author(s):
Abstract:
When Congress first passed legislation for federal aid ton highways in 1916, the maximum amount of aid was only $10,000, and since then, federal aid in the construction of highways has never been large. But in 1956, the Federal Aid Law, Title I authorized $125,000,000 in addition to $700,000,000 already available for 1957. Appropriations to states will be made based on state population, normal apportionment, and thereafter on estimates to Congress. In addition, the Highway Revenue Act of 1956 provided new taxes on gasoline, tires, trucks, and buses.
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Record #:
30640
Author(s):
Abstract:
The construction of the United States interstate highway will have an economic impact felt across the country. In addition to a boom in the asphalt industry and highway construction equipment, it is hoped that the highway program will also spur the steel industry, cut driving time and costs, and save lives with quicker access.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 14 Issue 6, November 1956, p18-20, 22, 85, por
Record #:
30638
Author(s):
Abstract:
State wide, the North Carolina Highway Commission is responsible for maintenance and improvement of over 10,000 miles of primary city highway; 54,000 miles of secondary roads, and 2450 miles of primary and secondary links between towns and cities. With over 68,000 miles under their supervision, North Carolina has the most extensive highway system under state control in the United States.
Subject(s):
Record #:
30641
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the construction of the interstate highway system, the Bureau of Public Roads has issued a statement about the benefits of the program and its development. In addition to providing more jobs for construction and industry support, the interstate highway program also provides increased safety, quicker traveling times, and community development.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 14 Issue 6, November 1956, p24-25, 27, 96, por
Record #:
30639
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States has an extensive system of interstate and defense highways, which serve all manner of economic and social activities. Although the route passes through the main industrial routes of the country, it is supplemented by state highways and routes the provide access to other regions.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 14 Issue 6, November 1956, p12-14, 16, 83, map
Record #:
30649
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has done a lot to advance highway facilities in the state, especially secondary roads. Since the 1930s, North Carolina has made a concerted effort to improve the vast mileage of unpaved roads, leading the nation improving not only the heavily trafficked main roads, but also the farm-to-market roads in every community.
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Record #:
30648
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the upcoming highway construction across the United States, steel, cement, bituminous and aggregate materials will be required in the millions of tons. Along with increased productivity, increased man power will also be needed, providing jobs for millions of laborers.
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Record #:
30650
Author(s):
Abstract:
Considered one of the greatest single engineering improvements in highway planning, limited access roads relieve traffic and highway congestion through North Carolina's communities. The limited access roads provide safety and permanence, preventing uncontrolled roadside development from overpowering the highway routes.
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Record #:
30668
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the Chairman of the Highway and Public Works Commission, A.H. Graham has been working to improve and expand North Carolina's highway system for 35 years. Graham make his first push in 1921, fighting for passage of the $50 million road bond issues to connect county seats with all principal cities. Graham has worked for North Carolina road system in many capacities from State Legislator, Lieutenant-Governor, Chairman of the Highway Commission, and Director of the Carolina's Motor Club.
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Record #:
30666
Author(s):
Abstract:
As North Carolina begins its part in the construction of the interstate highway system, the state has announced 17 new projects for the first year. These projects will cost over $28 million for the first of the 13 year program, providing funds for paving, grading, and other high engineering standards.
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Record #:
30667
Author(s):
Abstract:
The headquarters for North Carolina State Highway and Public Works Commission is now located in a modern office space in Raleigh. The five-story headquarters has offices for the various departments of the large road agency.
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Record #:
30673
Author(s):
Abstract:
Construction has been the largest industry in the United States for the past four years, and North Carolina has been enjoying better roads, schools, homes, factories, buildings, and utilities. North Carolina's construction contractors are well-equipped to take on the construction of new roads in the highway system. Most of the work on the new roads in the state will be done by builders who are members of the Carolina Branch of the Associated General Contractors of America, headquartered in Charlotte.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 14 Issue 6, November 1956, p68, 70, 72, 89, por
Record #:
30671
Author(s):
Abstract:
After graduating from NC State and serving during World War II, W.H. Rogers, Jr. joined the Pitt County engineering force, later moving to Raleigh as assistant to the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles and then the Highway Chairman, A.H. Graham. Rogers is now the Chief Highway Engineer for the North Carolina State Highway and Public Works Commission, and is in charge of the maintenance and construction of of the 70,000 miles of public roads running from the mountains to sea.
Record #:
30674
Author(s):
Abstract:
The trucking industry and North Carolina Motor Carriers Association are watching road and highway development closely. Their interest is prompted not only by the improvement of highway facilities but the cost they pay in taxes. Trucks now pay a higher rate in taxes under the 1956 Federal aid law on gasoline, tires, gross weight, and excise tax.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
30670
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although federal aid will help North Carolina with the highway development, it will not completely solve the problem of modernizing the primary road system. Nearly 3000 miles of roads in the state system need improvement, which will cost over $305 million to complete.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 14 Issue 6, November 1956, p52, 54, 56, 58, 90, por