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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for WNC Magazine Vol. 8 Issue 3, May/Jun 2014
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22347
Abstract:
Eleven conservationists have worked very hard to help preserve the wild and scenic places of Western North Carolina. They are Mike Leonard; Karen Cragnolin; Brian Payst; Paul Carlson; Sandy and Missy Schenck; Susie Hamrick Jones; John Humphrey; Tim Sweeney; and Jay Leutze.
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22344
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O'Sullivan examines the work of Molly Must, a muralist who uses public art to tell community stories. Must states that 90 percent of her time on a mural project is spent on fundraising and organizing and only10 percent on painting. For example, before she could paint the mural under the I-240 overpass, there were years of grant writing, public hearings, planning, and visits with NC Department of Transportation officials.
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Record #:
22348
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Richards reviews Highland Avenue, a newly opened (2013) Hickory restaurant owned by Meg Jenkins Locke. Chef Kyle McKnight is a graduate of Johnson and Wales in Charleston and has cooked in Miami, St. John, Argentina, and Wilmington. The restaurant is located in the former 1930s Hollar Hosiery Mill.
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22345
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In 2010, two skillful carpenters, Will Evert and Jason Brownlee, merged their love of woodworking and fishing to form French Broad Boatworks. Carter describes their boats as \"hand-hewn watercraft that becomes pieces of floating art.\"
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22346
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At 6,683 feet Mt. Mitchell in Western North Carolina is the highest peak east of the Mississippi River. Before the building of the Blue Ridge Parkway, visitors had two ways of reaching the summit--the Mt. Mitchell Railroad which opened in 1915 and the Mt. Mitchell Motor Road which opened in 1922.
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Record #:
22349
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DeNiece Guest and Nan Chase combine their love of gardening and home cooking to demonstrate that a drinkable landscape can exist in the backyard. For example, fruit trees, berries, herbs, vegetables, even wildflowers, can be drinkable crops, and most are easy to grow. Their recently published book, Drink the Harvest, shows how.
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