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7 results for The State Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980
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Record #:
8987
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Abstract:
Lieutenant Colonel Tazewell Lee Hargrove and six other officers of the 44th North Carolina Regiment were taken prisoner by the Yankees following their defense of the South Anna Bridge. Taken first to Fort Norfolk and then to Fort Delaware, these officers joined about 600 other Confederate prisoners of war. In 1863, these men were placed in a stockade outside Yankee forces on Morris Island, then under fire from the Confederates. Hargrove survived the war and was released after taking the Yankee oath of allegiance. He was elected North Carolina Attorney General in 1872, and had a successful law practice. Ravages inflicted on his body during his years as a prisoner led to his death in 1889 at the age of 59.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980, p26-28, 38, il, map
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Record #:
8985
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Abstract:
In autumn, fishing on the North Carolina coast is bountiful. However, when the fish are not biting, shellfish can be found in any coastal water area that is not polluted. Clams can be raked during low tide in creek beds, along the banks, and on old sandbars. Crabs can be baited using nets and fish heads. Oysters are found in clusters on the edges of marshes and along creeks at low tide. It is necessary, however, to check local laws which define sizes and quantities of shellfish that can be removed from these areas.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980, p19-20, il
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Record #:
8984
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Abstract:
B. H. Griffin and his wife took ownership of the Sir Walter Hotel of Raleigh in 1928, and transformed it into a hub of political life. Many political figures and their wives moved into the Sir Walter's apartments. Wives of various officials formed an organization called the Sir Walter Cabinet that met in Mrs. Griffin's apartment at the Sir Walter. By the 1960s, increased membership forced the cabinet to meet at various places in and around Raleigh. The Sir Walter was also used for wedding receptions and parties, and housed the Sphinx Club, a gentleman's retreat.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980, p16-18, 40, il, por
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Record #:
8981
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Abstract:
The molasses mill in Cleveland County is one of the few places left in North Carolina where molasses is made. Fitzhugh McMurry's mill has been in operation for over a century. This year, McMurry planted fifteen acres of sugar cane and is expecting a yield of about six hundred gallons of molasses. McMurry begins making his molasses in mid-September, and has customers as far away as California come to purchase it.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980, p8-9, 12, il
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Record #:
8983
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Abstract:
Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Glendale Springs houses a fresco painted by Ben Long of Statesville. The fresco depicts the Last Supper. Fresco is a style of painting where the artist paints directly on the wet plaster, thus infusing the paint with the wall. Long, an apprentice of Italian artist Pietro Annigoni, was awarded the Leonardo Da Vinci prize in 1975 as the most promising artist in Europe.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980, p13-14, 16, il
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Record #:
8986
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Abstract:
Bluff Mountain was purchased by the North Carolina Nature Conservatory last year. Over thirty rare and endangered plants grow on the mountain. Many rare birds have been spotted on or around the mountain. The conservatory has erected a gate to discourage hikers and bicyclists from roaming the mountain and trampling the vegetation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980, p22-25, 32, il
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Record #:
8982
Abstract:
In 1825, the Literary Fund was adopted by congress, and led to the creation of a public school in every county in North Carolina by 1846. By 1865, however, the Literary Fund was depleted, and all of the schools were closed. In 1880, the Davis School, a military boarding school for boys, opened in La Grange. In 1889, after several students died from meningitis and the school was forced to close.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980, p10-12, il, por
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