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7 results for Bluff Mountain
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Record #:
8986
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Bluff Mountain was purchased by the North Carolina Nature Conservatory last year. Over thirty rare and endangered plants grow on the mountain. Many rare birds have been spotted on or around the mountain. The conservatory has erected a gate to discourage hikers and bicyclists from roaming the mountain and trampling the vegetation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980, p22-25, 32, il
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Record #:
24648
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Bluff Mountain in Ashe County offers locals and tourists alike a space for solitude, picnics, and sightseeing. The author discusses his visit to the top of the mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 22, April 1959, p14-15, 20, il
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Record #:
26402
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Abstract:
Bluff Mountain in Ashe County, North Carolina is considered one of the most valuable natural areas in the state. To help preserve this community of native plants and animals, the North Carolina Nature Conservancy has received a large grant from the James E. Hanes memorial Foundation.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 23 Issue (26) 3, Sept 1979, p12
Record #:
6065
Author(s):
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Rising 5,100 feet in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Bluff Mountain, near West Jefferson, is a treasure chest of botanical riches. Forty-two rare, endangered animals and flowering plants, including the bog turtle, wood lily, and sundew, are found there. An unusual feature of the mountain is a highland plateau that contains the only fen in the southern Appalachians.
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Record #:
29196
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Bluff Mountain, deep in the Blue Ridge of Ashe County, has been prized by conservation scientists for years as the single most significant, unspoiled area in North Carolina. The mountain holds majestic scenery, diverse habitat, and rare fauna and flora. Bluff Mountain takes its name from a protruding rock bluff on its northeastern face.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p37, il
Record #:
29858
Author(s):
Abstract:
Students at Mars Hill University’s Liston B. Ramsey Center for Regional Studies created a new exhibit titled, The Fight for Bluff: A Community’s Effort to Preserve Its Mountain. The display examines public outcry following a proposal in 1996 to clear-cut Bluff Mountain, Madison County’s highest peak. The students’ research tracked down documents and photos from activists, and how communities organized to save their mountain from destruction.
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