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9 results for The State Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955
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Record #:
13099
Author(s):
Abstract:
A growing audience of children and adults alike are being introduced to the mountains of western North Carolina by children's authors Ruth and Latrobe Carroll. Although originally from New York City, they moved to Asheville and their work illustrates the mountain traditions and beautiful scenery of that area through hand sketches and adventurous stories.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955, p12-13, 34, il, f
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Record #:
13100
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Abstract:
The tradition of handing down ancient ballads is still occurring in the hills and coastlands of North Carolina. Betty Vaiden Williams became attracted to ballad-singing after a trip to Kentucky, leading her to search for material and collections of Appalachian songs. She has appeared on Bill O'Sullivan's \"Poor Richard\" Almanac program over WUNC-TV and is considered to be the foremost interpreter of North Carolina ballads.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955, p16, f
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Record #:
13098
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Did North Carolina, in proportion of its population, put the most men into the Confederate armies? Estimates cause some confusion, but North Carolina was probably second to Tennessee in the number of men in the Confederacy, and possibly first in proportion to its population.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955, p11, 34, il, por
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Record #:
13096
Abstract:
The day after the American Boy Scouts were incorporated, J.W. Clay organized four patrols of eight boys each in Hickory, North Carolina. Sources may indicate that not only were these groups the first Scouts in North Carolina, but perhaps in the whole nation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955, p9-10, f
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Record #:
13097
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The state of North Carolina is named after Charles I, a 17th century King of England, who ordered all land lying south of the Great Dismal Swamp, as far as Florida, to be named Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955, p10, por
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Record #:
13101
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This portion of the map shows the frontier conditions of this portion of North Carolina. This section displays the area bordering the state of South Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955, p19, map
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Record #:
13127
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DeLue recounts his visit to New Bern. He provides a short history of New Bern and the construction of Royal Governor William Tyron's great palace on the banks of the Trent River. After interest was sparked with the restoration of Williamsburg, Virginia; two New Bern natives, Gertrude S. Carraway and J.E. Latham, decided Tyron Palace deserved to be included in the historic preservation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955, p21-22, f
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Record #:
15656
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Robert E. Lee was built in Winston-Salem in 1921. Originally constructed with 200 rooms, the management added another 150 in 1929. The hotel had hard times during the 1930s and the World War II period, although prosperous, left it in a shabby state. In 1948, Doug Boyle came from the Statler hotel chain where he had been assistant to the chairman of the board and took over management of the Robert E. Lee. Under his direction the dilapidated property was rehabilitated into a million-dollar success.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955, p14-15, 34, il
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Record #:
15657
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Abstract:
Dunn describes the Ranch House, a restaurant located just outside Chapel Hill, where people go not to eat but to dine. The restaurant has been recommend by Gourmet magazine, one of the few North Carolina establishments to be so blessed, and was recently picked by Ford Times \"famous restaurant.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955, p42, il
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