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6 results for The State Vol. 22 Issue 5, July 1954
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Record #:
13168
Author(s):
Abstract:
Comprising 60,000 acres and inhabited by 10,000 individuals, Swain County is the state's most visited region. Containing the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Cherokee Reservation, Nantahala Gorge, Blue Ridge Parkway, Nantahala National Forest, and Fontana Lake, Swain County is a mountainous region. First explored in 1795 and mapped in 1858, Swain is a diverse locality containing natural wonders as well as agriculture, manufacturing, and measured progress.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 5, July 1954, p18-26, il
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Record #:
13167
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, located on the border of western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee, is America's most visited national park. Funded by the United States Government and donations on behalf of John D. Rockefeller, the Great Smoky Mountains national park encompasses 507,159.16 acres.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 5, July 1954, p13-14, il
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Record #:
13166
Author(s):
Abstract:
With an estimated 2,800 individuals comprising North Carolina's Cherokee Indian Nation, the indigenous peoples of the state were at one time considered the most progressive tribe in America.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 5, July 1954, p10-11, il
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Record #:
15709
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this excerpt from his book, Heart of the Alleghenies, Zeigler and Grosscup describe their first visit to the Nantahala Gorge in 1881 and the primitive conditions of the trip.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 5, July 1954, p15-16, il
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Record #:
15710
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author describes some roads, not necessarily rough, but good to passable, which will take the travelers into the hinterlands of the Great Smoky Mountains, such as the road to Bigswitch Gap and the one to Newfound Gap.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 5, July 1954, p30-31, 33, map
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Record #:
15708
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pleasants examines the status of today's Cherokees, who live on their reservation in Western North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 5, July 1954, p10-12, il
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