NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for The Researcher Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2001
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
34645
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carteret County’s first golf course opened in Beaufort in June 1937. Part of a Works Progress Administration project, the course was constructed to boost tourism. A club house accompanied the 9-hole course and was used for socializing. Membership fees were set at $18/year. In 1941, a lookout tower was constructed on the course to serve as an observation post. Additional rail tracks were placed on the course to assist with chemical transport associated with the war effort. The author attributes World War II to the decline and eventual closure of the course.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2001, p4-5, il
Record #:
34650
Abstract:
During the 17th century, North American colonial merchants were responsible for conducting coastal trade and assumed all responsibility for shipping, storing, and selling trade goods. While this system fell out of practice during the 18th century in many North American colonies, it remained the primary trade system in Carteret County. The town of Portsmouth is one example of this system. Established in 1754, town residents facilitated handling and transportation of merchant cargoes throughout the Outer Banks. A customs official was stationed in Portsmouth to inspect and tax goods coming in and out of the county.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2001, p25-26, map
Record #:
34649
Author(s):
Abstract:
USS CURRITUCK was named for the Currituck Sound near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. CURRITUCK was a seaplane tender commissioned during the Second World War. After serving at Leyte Gulf, CURRITUCK was refitted for a mapping operation of Antarctica. During the Cold War, CURRITUCK’s seaplanes tracked Russian submarines throughout the Caribbean and North Atlantic. Following a refit in 1960, CURRITUCK again patrolled the Western Pacific Ocean where it provided tender operations for the Vietnam War. The vessel was decommissioned in 1971 and scrapped the following year.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2001, p23-24, il
Record #:
34648
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the late 20th century, the grave of Revolutionary War-era colonist, Robert Williams, was discovered in Morehead City. During the Revolutionary War, Williams worked in Beaufort as a colonial salt maker. The salt works, established 1776, were erected to decrease American dependence on European salt imports. Following the war, the salt making trend continued and production again spiked with salt shortages during the American Civil War.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2001, p21-22, il
Record #:
34646
Author(s):
Abstract:
Author Pat Davis grew up in Durham but spent his summers at Morehead City. His family owned a cottage on 12th Street which was still ‘undiscovered’ by wealthy vacationers. The family rarely ate out while visiting the coast due to the large amount of tourist traffic. The author recalls spending time at the beach and visiting various establishments including the dog races. Following the Korean War, the family stopped visiting Bogue Banks.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2001, p8-10, il
Record #:
34647
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chartered in 1858, Morehead City was founded on Sheppards Point. One of the first industries, the railroad, was established to link Morehead City to settlements along the Mississippi River. While this venture ultimately failed, a number of small houses and businesses were erected over the following decades. During the Civil War, many structures were used by Union soldiers who made additional improvements to infrastructure. Post-war, various civil works were erected to modernize the City.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2001, p17-20, il, por