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5 results for The Researcher Vol. 10 Issue 2, Spring 1994
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Record #:
34514
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1994 Carteret County Historical Society Annual Writing Contest winners were all middle school students from the Harkers Island School. The contest, which involved submitting a poem addressing historical people or events, was open to middle schoolers throughout the county. The first and second place poems from each grade are included in the article.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p4-7, il, por
Record #:
34517
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brinson fondly remembers going to see Fred Royal at Mr. Fred’s barbershop in downtown Morehead City. Mr. Royal, a barber between 1891 and 1956, was an active member of the community and, as Brinson recalls, created an environment for discussing current events and catching up on daily life in his shop.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p12-13
Record #:
34513
Author(s):
Abstract:
The sharpie is a popular vernacular watercraft found in North Carolina. Featuring a long narrow hull and flat bottom, sharpies originated in the Northeast in the mid-1800s. The first sharpie built in Carteret County was GOODWIN, constructed 1867. Used for fishing and oystering, the vessel measured 40 feet in length and was 11 tons burthen.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p3, il
Record #:
34516
Abstract:
Goodwin provides suggestions for conducting genealogical research in historic cemeteries; everything from locating cemetery records to making grave marker rubbings is covered. Interspersed between the suggestions are personal anecdotes regarding successes and failures in cemetery research.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p10-11
Record #:
34515
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a reprint of an 1810 letter describing Beaufort written by Jacob Henry, a Jewish County representative in the State General Assembly. Henry discusses the town’s shipbuilding, whaling, and fishing industries, as well as points of interest for tourists.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p8-9