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9 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010
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Record #:
13508
Abstract:
Margaret Anna Robertson was born in 1810, and in 1831, she married the Rev. Robert Burwell. In 1835, the family moved to Hillsborough, where Rev. Burwell had accepted the pastorate of the Presbyterian Church. There, she was prompted by local townspeople to open a school. In 1837, the Burwell School opened, initially for local girls. Burwell's curriculum for girls was progressive for the times and offered courses such as penmanship, geography, astronomy, algebra, chemistry, and philosophy. In 1857, the Burwells moved to Charlotte, where Rev. Burwell became president of the Charlotte Female Institute, now Queens University of Charlotte.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p31-34, il, por
Record #:
13481
Abstract:
In 1839, Thomas Day, the master cabinetmaker from Milton in Caswell County, acquired ten-year-old Archibald Clark as an apprentice. State law required that all orphans and children of unmarried parents be bound to a master or mistress through indenture to the age of twenty-one. Marshall describes what Archibald's life would have been like during his indenture period.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p20-23, il
Record #:
13431
Abstract:
Dr. John D. Bellamy constructed a grand mansion in Wilmington in 1859. It remains one of the city's most cherished historic landmarks and includes some of the best features that money could buy during the antebellum period.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p12-14, il, por
Record #:
13482
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1968, the small farmhouse once owned by Silas and Rebecca Everett in Edgecombe County was moved from Conetoe to Tarboro. It is part of a complex of historic buildings highlighting life in the antebellum period. Fleming describes the small, three-room home and how the residents lived there.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p24-27, il
Record #:
13459
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stagville was one of the largest antebellum plantations in North Carolina. It covered 30,000 acres of land in Orange and three other counties on which almost nine hundred enslaved individuals worked in the years before the Civil War. Puryear describes what life there was like.
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Record #:
13430
Author(s):
Abstract:
Renes uses the birthplace of Governor Zebulon B. Vance as a focal point to explain what daily life was like in the North Carolina mountains in the decades before the Civil War.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p9-11, il, por
Record #:
13509
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the antebellum period the county court was the highest legal and administrative authority in each county. The court met once each three month period, or four times a year, at the county seat for a period of one week. Blake describes the functions of the court and what might transpire during that week.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p28-30, il
Record #:
13460
Abstract:
Conser explains what can be learned through the study of a place of worship and its congregation. The First Presbyterian Church of Wilmington is used as an example.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p15-17, il
Record #:
13510
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1820, more than 7,000 Cherokee Indians lived in the North Carolina Mountains. In 1838, most of the Cherokee in the southeastern United States were rounded up by the United States government and removed to Oklahoma, and Duncan describes what their life was like before it was disrupted.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p35-36, il