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11 results for Historic buildings--Wilmington
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Record #:
3181
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Thalian Hall in Wilmington is often called the city's crown jewel. Built in 1855, it is the last surviving theater of 19th-century American theater architect John Montague. The theater is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Record #:
4252
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Although architect James F. Post did most of the planning, family sources indicate inspiration for the design of the Bellamy Mansion came from Dr. John D. Bellamy's eldest daughter, Mary Elizabeth. The home was built in 1859-61. Mary also had input in furniture and fabric selections and created a number of oil paintings for the walls. Forced to flee Wilmington during the Civil War and the Union occupation, the family was able to enjoy their home only after the Yankees went home.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 101, Summer/Fall 1996, p10-11, il, por
Record #:
6721
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The article discusses the construction of the David Reid Murchison house in Wilmington in the late 19th-century. Also included are alterations to the house, a list of family members connected with the house over the years, and owners of the house after the Murchison family.
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Record #:
6967
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METRO design editor Diane Lea discusses the role of The National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of North Carolina in saving, restoring, and maintaining three of the most significant residences associated with the role of the state and the capital city in the Revolutionary War. The residences are the Joel Lane House (Raleigh) ca. 1770; Haywood Hall at New Bern Place (Raleigh) 1799; and the Burgwin-Wright House (Wilmington) 1770.
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Record #:
7518
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Built in 1847, St. Thomas was Wilmington's first Catholic church and served both black and white parishioners. When St. Mary's Church opened in 1911, the parish divided, and St. Thomas served the African American community. When desegregation came in the 1950s, St. Thomas closed. The church fell into disrepair, and in 1970, the Historic St. Thomas Preservation Society formed to restore the building. Warren discusses the work of Betty Ann Sanders with the preservation society.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 7, Dec 2005, p30-33, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8811
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Thalian Hall was built in 1855 and has served as Wilmington's center for theatre arts. After its opening, the theatre became a major success and continued its role during the Civil War hosting many performances for Confederate Soldiers. During Reconstruction, Thalian Hall suffered financial difficulties, though it later recovered. Famous actors including Oscar Wilde, Buffalo Bill and Lillian Russell made appearances in the late 19th- and early 20th-centuries. Thalian Hall fell into disrepair during the 1940s and 1950s, but since 1973 a major renovation effort has taken place. The theatre retains much of its original architectural design and was used as a reference for the recent renovation of Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p18-20, por
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Record #:
8857
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In 1854, Wilmington's town commissioners contracted for a new theater as well as a new city hall. The result was Thalian Hall, which opened in 1858 and could seat 1,000 people. The list of performers from that date down to the present reads like a who's who of national and international entertainers. Tony Rivenbark, who became the theater's executive director in 1979, has been associated with the theater over forty years--as a student at Wilmington College (now UNCW), as a performer in over seventy-five plays, and as a chronicler and preserver of the theater's history. Thalian Hall is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p86-88, 90, 92-93, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
18576
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The Governor Dudley mansion is one of the most important structures in Wilmington. The dwelling is associated with some of North Carolina's most significant figures in politics, business, industry, and philanthropy.
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Record #:
18901
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In November 1989, The Board of Directors of the Bellamy Mansion in Wilmington presented the intention of conveying ownership of the property to the North Carolina Preservation Foundation.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 78, Spring 1990, p6, f
Record #:
13431
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Dr. John D. Bellamy constructed a grand mansion in Wilmington in 1859. It remains one of the city's most cherished historic landmarks and includes some of the best features that money could buy during the antebellum period.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p12-14, il, por
Record #:
28298
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Designed by Mr. Trimble of New York, Thalian Hall held its grand opening in Wilmington on the night of October 12, 1858. There were elaborate decorations of fluted columns and bright colors alongside a complex system of trapdoors on-stage to assist in setting the scene. Broadfoot documents the early acting seasons that began once Thalian Hall opened, in addition to describing the role of the theatre in public life for Wilmington residents during the Civil War.
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