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5 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 23 Issue 3, Spring 1984
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16135
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Gertrude Weil was president of the Goldsboro chapter of the Equal Suffrage League. After ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment she remained a political and civic figure aiding the impoverished during the Great Depression and paying expenses for Jews fleeing Nazi-occupied France.
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16133
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Charlotte Hawkins Brown was integral to reforming African American education within the state. She began her teaching career in 1901 after the American Missionary Association offered her a position. A year later she raised funds to open the Palmer Institute, a preparatory school in Sedalia.
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16134
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During World War I, women fulfilled many different roles as nurses in combat or taking industrial jobs at home. Suzanne Hoskins was one of fourteen nurses sent to Europe from Guilford County. She arrived in Paris in 1917 and was assigned to the American Red Cross Children's Bureau.
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Record #:
16131
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When Europeans encountered Cherokee tribes the men were surprised by the important role women played within Cherokee society. Their society was based on a matrilineal kinship, unlike European family dynamics, and Cherokee women also participated in family, economic, and government decision making.
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Record #:
16132
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Women performed a range of tasks on late 19th- and early 20th-century farms throughout rural North Carolina. Women cared for livestock, grew gardens, and completed household chores.
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