NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Jones, Lu Ann
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
15864
Author(s):
Abstract:
Use of informal, sometimes grammatically incorrect language, to write her book Mama Learned Us to Work: Farm Women in the New South, Dr. Lu Ann Jones conjures up a gritty account of real women in early20th-century North Carolina. Using of oral history, Dr. Jones explores the variety of work and various roles women filled during this period.
Full Text:
Record #:
20236
Author(s):
Abstract:
A class on oral history, taught at East Carolina University in 1997, decided to focus its efforts on documenting the work and lives of teachers during the culmination of the class. This article narrates several of the interviews of teachers, most of who worked in North Carolina, many during the Civil Rights period, as they recounted their careers.
Source:
Record #:
16132
Author(s):
Abstract:
Women performed a range of tasks on late 19th- and early 20th-century farms throughout rural North Carolina. Women cared for livestock, grew gardens, and completed household chores.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
31214
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1920s, peddlers and rolling stores brought household goods to the parlors and porches of rural women in eastern North Carolina. Itinerant merchants were alternatives for women who felt uncomfortable in country stores, or were unable to visit stores due to practical constraints. A third kind of itinerant merchant were agents who represented large enterprises such as the W.T. Rawleigh Company and the J.R. Watkins Medical Company.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p32-34, por
Record #:
25379
Abstract:
Three former East Carolina Teachers College reflect on the excitement they felt when Amelia Earhart visited the campus and how the visit inspired them.