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16 results for Sea Chest Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979
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Record #:
7524
Author(s):
Abstract:
Construction of the first Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was authorized by Congress in 1794. Price recounts the history of the lighthouse from its construction in 1803 until it was demolished in 1867 in order to build a taller one. A number of problems connected with the structure are listed. The main problem was finding a builder for the job. Later problems included illnesses of the contractor and his crew, poor oil quality, and erosion of the lighthouse base.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p2-5, il
Record #:
7534
Author(s):
Abstract:
Steve Roberts was born on Portsmouth Island on October 1, 1901, and lived there until 1912, when his family moved to Morehead City. In this SEA CHEST interview, Roberts reminisces about his life on the island, including entertainment, home remedies, ponies, and the great freeze.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p22-27, por
Record #:
29896
Abstract:
A dream of the Dare County, North Carolina people for over 40 years, the Wanchese Seafood Industrial Park is the largest commercial enterprise in county. Located on Roanoke Island, the site is 45 acres and financed with county, state, and federal funds. The park will provide up to 400 jobs and North Carolina legislation is creating a NC Seafood Industrial Park Authority for maintaining and operating this park and others the might be developed in the state.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p18-21, por, map
Record #:
29901
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cisterns have been used on Hatteras Island, North Carolina for decades, and some of them are still being used. These large containers are used to collect and store rainwater in case issues arise with water plant supplies in the future.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p38-39, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29892
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was completed in 1803 for a cost of $38,450 and kept by Adam Gaskins. But within the first year of service, the lighthouse was seeing problems. Oil cisterns were too small, fires destroyed glass lanterns, and erosion already began to tear away at the tower base. Despite contracts for repair, conditions continued to wear away with complaints of poor quality in the 1820s and 1830s. Although faults were corrected in the 1850s, raising the tower 150 feet and providing a new lighting device, Union forces captured the light in 1861 while Confederate soldiers took the lens. After the war, it was determined to be cheaper to build a new lighthouse than fix this one, so the old tower was torn down.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p2-5, il, por
Record #:
29894
Abstract:
Loggerhead turtle eggs are being transplanted to Cape Hatteras in attempts to get more nesting to take place. Fishing nets, tire tracks, and predators have been an issue for turtle hatchlings. But with the transplants and educating fishermen on what to do when turtles are caught in their nets, refuge managers are hoping the loggerhead populations will grow.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p12-14, por
Record #:
29899
Abstract:
When Captain Ernal Foster came back from service in World War II, he wanted to bring together the charter business and his family's love of fishing. Foster was the first to start the charter fishing business on Hatteras Island, and as time progressed more people started coming to the business. As business and publicity spread, Foster's one boat grew into a fleet--the famous Albatross Fleet.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p30-33, por
Record #:
29898
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1920s and 1930s, Steve Roberts fished for sharks off Morehead City, North Carolina. Roberts and others in the shark fishery used 30 foot long boats and long nets with large mesh, and sharks would be brought up on hooks attached to the mast and boom. Sharks ranged from 65 to 850 pounds and up to 16 feet long. Fins, skins, and flesh were used for different purposes and sold in different places, even different countries.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p28-29, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
29895
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the 1930s, George Gray's family has run the oldest fish house in Avon. In the early years of the fishing industry, fishing was steady and so was the price, and Mr. Gray's family sold to numerous fish companies over the years. But now, fishing goes up and down, and the prices changes rapidly, especially for seasonal fish like crabs.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p15-17, por
Record #:
29897
Abstract:
Born on Portsmouth Island, North Carolina in 1901, Steve Roberts and his love of Portsmouth has continued even when his family moved to Morehead City. Oystering and help from neighbors kept the community prosperous, while singing, traditions, and dreams kept the community together. But storms and changing beaches pushed the decline of Portsmouth Island in the end.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p22-27, por
Record #:
29902
Abstract:
Commercial fishing has been happening on Outer Banks for generations, and long hauling is just one of many of the techniques used to bring in fish. With nets over 1500 yards long, long hauling takes long hours and hard work, and requires the cooperation of three boats to push, pull, and bail.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p40-45, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29893
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, now 108 years old, stands only 310 feet from the inlet. As erosion threatens the Outer Banks, the National Park Service is considering three options to save the lighthouse: let nature take its course; move the lighthouse; or build up the beach around it.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p9-11, por
Record #:
29900
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the villages of Rodanthe, Waves, and Salvo, Old Christmas has been celebrated by the community for years. This tradition includes oyster roasts and an event known as 'Old Buck," where a black and white bull trample through the village.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p34-37, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29920
Abstract:
Cape Hatteras is known as one of the most dangerous coastlines in the world, particularly because of the Diamond Shoals. Located 16 miles off Hatteras Island, Diamond Shoal's shifting sands have earned the area the Graveyard of the Atlantic, and if it weren't for the aid of the Life Saving Service, even more ships would have been wrecked.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p46-47, por
Record #:
29921
Author(s):
Abstract:
Making trawls nets is an art form, and Matthew Salter of Alliance, North Carolina has been practicing it for 37 years. With specialized needles and templates, Salter makes nets of all sizes and shapes for local fisherman that travel all over the country.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p48-53, il, por
Subject(s):