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17 results for Our State Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007
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Record #:
8859
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In 1913, an unidentified mammal washed up on Bird Shoal Island, located inside the entrance to Beaufort Inlet on the North Carolina coast. It was a whale that measured sixteen feet long and had a beak, but what kind of whale was it? Eventually the remains reached the Smithsonian Institution where Frederick W. True, the nation's foremost expert on marine mammals, realized the remains were from an undocumented species. Since he was first to describe the new species, he assigned its official Latin name--Mesoplodon mirus. The whale is commonly called True's beaked whale. In 1940, a pregnant beaked whale was found along the Outer Banks and examined by North Carolina's famed naturalist H. H. Brimley. It would be eighty years later, on May 29, 1993, before beaked whales were seen in the wild. Appropriately the sighting was off the Outer Banks, forty-five miles southeast of Hatteras Inlet. Since 1993, other sightings have been rare, and the creature remains one of the most elusive of the ocean's mammals.
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8857
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In 1854, Wilmington's town commissioners contracted for a new theater as well as a new city hall. The result was Thalian Hall, which opened in 1858 and could seat 1,000 people. The list of performers from that date down to the present reads like a who's who of national and international entertainers. Tony Rivenbark, who became the theater's executive director in 1979, has been associated with the theater over forty years--as a student at Wilmington College (now UNCW), as a performer in over seventy-five plays, and as a chronicler and preserver of the theater's history. Thalian Hall is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p86-88, 90, 92-93, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8861
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For the past twenty-five years, Kinston in Lenoir County has been a bluegrass music center. The town is home to the Eastern North Carolina Bluegrass Association. Carol Tyndall, the president of the association, is unique in that she doesn't sing or play a musical instrument, but she loves the music so much that she has devoted twenty years to the organization. Westbrook recounts how it grew from its start in an old barn in 1981 to a bluegrass venue where bands are booked for performance almost a year in advance. Kinston is host to the Annual Kinston Winter Bluegrass Festival, which is also unique because it is held indoors during wintertime. Started in 1994, the festival attracts over 1,800 fans to the two-day event.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p120-122, 124, 126-127, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8862
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Frank Warner attended Duke University from 1921 to 1925. He is widely known for his ability as a singer, banjoist, American traditional folk music collector, author, and performer. Between 1938 and 1966, he and his wife Anne traveled from North Carolina to New Hampshire, collecting American songs. On North Carolina's Outer Banks the Warners built relationships with local families and recorded songs from faraway places and times long gone by. In 1941, they recorded more than one hundred tracks from singers in Wanchese, Manns Harbor, Kitty Hawk, Nags Head, and other towns.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p128-130, 132, 134, il, por Periodical Website
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8855
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Brevard, in Transylvania County, is home to one of the few white squirrel populations in the country. The squirrels are not albinos. While a student at Brevard College, Bob Glesener founded the White Squirrel Research Institute. Now a Brevard associate professor of biology emeritus, he continues his study of the white squirrels. Glesener discusses the history of the Brevard population, which was accidentally introduced over fifty years ago. Since 2004, Brevard has celebrated an annual White Squirrel Festival, and the local White Squirrel Shoppe sells white squirrel products, including mugs, candles, and ornaments. The festival draws between 15,000 and 18,000 people.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p48-50, 52-53, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8858
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King, located in both Stokes and Forsyth Counties twenty miles north of Winston-Salem, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month. Mitchell recounts the history of the town, which began with a simple log cabin in 1826. She also lists things to see while visiting there, including the King Drug Company, Dari-O, Gentry's Hardware, and Central Park. For today's 6,500 residents, the town provides the best of two worlds--a small, quiet place to live with a rural atmosphere together with access to big-city amenities.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p20-22, 24-25, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
8854
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In this ongoing series about favorite Southern foods, Garner looks into the kitchen and discovers chicken dumplings. He includes several recipes on how to prepare this dish and lists three eating establishments that serve them, including Old School Mill's Fresh House (Locust); Stephenson's Bar-B-Cue (Willow Springs); and Hog Heaven Bar-B-Q (Durham).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p36-38, 40, 42, 44-48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8860
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Born and bred in the Carolinas, the shag has been the official popular dance of North Carolina since the 2005 Session of the General Assembly passed legislation to make it so. Pittard discusses the history of the dance which reportedly has been around since the 1920s. Both North Carolina and South Carolina share the dance and the music it helped bring about. Each state had its own bands, clubs, contests, national shag champions, and disc jockeys who helped spread the dance.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p94-96, 98, 100-101, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8856
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In this continuing series on the best walks to take in North Carolina, Setzer describes a walk through the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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8863
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North Carolina's longest running dance, the Carolina Dance Society's annual Spring German, has been taking place at Raynor's Warehouse in Rocky Mount since 1870. Blackburn recounts the history of the dance. The german was a two-step dance with a leader who goes at the head of its intricate figures. The dance was the social event of the region and attracted hundreds to the warehouse where it was held, some from as far away as Atlanta and Houston.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p136-138, 140, 142-143, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8878
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North Carolina has many memorials in remembrance of the service of its Confederate soldiers. One of the most unusual is in Haywood County. In 1925, a fire ravaged over 25,000 acres of red spruce and Fraser fir trees. In 1939, the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDF) at their state convention in Asheville proposed the planting of 125,000 trees in Haywood County to honor the same number of soldiers North Carolina sent to serve in the Civil War. By 1943, seedlings representing each soldier had been planted. Pegram describes the forest's growth up to the present. The forest may be viewed from the Mount Hardy Overlook, located at Milepost 422.8, on the Blue Ridge Parkway.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p208-210, 212, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8875
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Many smaller towns along North Carolina's coast are falling victim to spreading development and increasing tax rates. With commercial fishing declining and a high market value on property, many working-class people choose to sell in hopes of getting some financial security. When this happens, the old traditions that have existed in towns for over one hundred years slowly slip away. Salter Path in Carteret County is one example. The town is poised on the edge of exploding prices, modern development, and inevitable irreversible change. Morris discusses the work of Fielding Darden, who produced a CD and book in 2006, titled WILL THIS TOWN SURVIVE, and his activities to preserve the town's history.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p156-160, 162, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8879
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Milling discusses the artwork of Jeff Pittman, who lives in Fletcher in Henderson County. He grew up exposed to art. His father, Bob Pittman, is a highly regarded painter who lives in Greenville, and his mother Claire Pittman is a poet and history professor at East Carolina University. Besides his landscape paintings, Pittman has carved out a popular niche as a painter of city skylines and has painted skylines of Chicago, New York, Nashville, Charlotte, Raleigh, and Wilmington. Presently, he is concentrating his work on the state's mountains and the skyline and street scenes of downtown Asheville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p214-216, 218-219, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8874
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The South has a rich legacy of playwrights. When Gary Cole moved from Portland, Oregon to Raleigh, he realized that North Carolina did not have a festival that highlighted Southern playwrights. Having been an active member of the theatre community in Portland, he set out to see what he could do. Sauls discusses how a mixture of one fan of Southern playwrights with a magical old theatre in Wilson's Edna Boykin Cultural Center and a supportive local community resulted in the Theatre of the American South Festival. The festival debuted in May 2006.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p146-148, 150, 152-153, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8880
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Madison County is a mountain county covering 450 square miles. It has three incorporated towns--Marshall, Mars Hill, and Hot Springs; a population of 20,000; and a public school system of 2,500. The county has an abundance of natural resources and beauty. Pisgah National Forest covers almost half the county, and the Appalachian Trail runs along the northern border. Westbrook describes various places that visitors will enjoy.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p220-222, 224, 226, il Periodical Website
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