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11 results for Our State Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004
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Record #:
6852
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Kernersville, incorporated in 1871, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The Forsyth County town traces its history back to 1745, when William Dobson, a wealthy Irish immigrant, built an inn and store on the present site. The economy of the town was tied to tobacco, furniture, and textiles in the 20th-century, but those industries have declined. Today the town is home to 12 motor freight companies and over two dozen small manufacturing companies. One of the interesting sites to visit is the home Jule Korner built in Kernersville in 1880. Dubbed \"Korner's Folly,\" the red brick building stands 100 feet high, has seven stories, and is a wonder of opulence, oddity, detail, and combined architectural styles. The 22-room mansion is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Other points of interest are the Pegg House Tea Room, Honeybee Festival, and the Kernersville Little Theater.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p18-20, 22, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
6853
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Sunburst, a sawmill town in Haywood County, was founded in 1908, to supply wood to the paper mill in nearby Canton. The town had a brief, but interesting, history. Peter G. Thomson, an Ohio paper manufacturer, built the town and mill. Forestry expert Carl A. Schenck moved the Biltmore School of Forestry there for a few years. A Tennessee company, prominent for its work in building the Panama Canal, constructed a twenty-mile railroad line between Canton and Sunburst. The Episcopal Church built a mission school there. In 1931, the wood supply ran out, and the Sunburst mill was shut down and dismantled. The workforce moved to the Canton mill. In 1932, a dam was built across the West Fork of the Pigeon River, submerging the remnants of the town under eighty-seven-acre Lake Logan.
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Record #:
6857
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Catawba County, with a population of almost 150,000, has eight municipalities and covers 405 square miles of Blue Ridge foothills. The county possesses a number of historic sites and exhibits, including the Catawba Museum of History, the old Catawba County Courthouse, Murray's Mill Historic District, and the state's last remaining 19th-century covered bridge, the Bunker Hill Covered Bridge. The county has long been known for its furniture business. Tourism is also a strong part of the local economy. The local arts scene is alive and well with the state's second-oldest art museum, third-oldest community theatre, and Catawba Valley pottery, a tradition that stretches back two centuries.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p46-48, 50-52, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6861
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Oak Ridge Military Academy, established in 1852, is located in Oak Ridge in Guilford County. In the early 20th-century, the school was hailed as one of the finest secondary schools in the country; that reputation for excellence continues into the 21st-century. This reputation extends beyond the state's borders, with approximately 240 members of the student body coming from 26 states and 20 foreign countries. Tuition is not cheap; the boarding program costs $19,990 and the day program $13,300. Oak Ridge is the nation's third oldest military school and has been designated a North Carolina Historical Site.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p140-142, 144, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6859
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In 1926, a school was raised in a black community near the town of Wake Forest in Wake County. The school was one of 813 Rosenwald Schools built in North Carolina and was named for its first principal, W. M. McElrath. Goebel describes the construction of the school and the classroom activities after it opened. The school integrated in 1970, and it closed in 1989, when a new school was built nearby. In 1998, an association spearheaded by former students purchased the building, with the intent of restoring it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p120-122, 125-126, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6860
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The American Hebrew Academy, located on 100 acres of rolling woodland in Greensboro, is a one-of-a-kind Jewish boarding school for high school students who come from as far away as Mexico and Moldava. The benefactor of the school is Greensboro resident Maurice Sabbah. The school seeks to develop each student's individual intelligence, strength of character, and Jewish identity to prepare them for admission to the finest colleges and universities and positions of leadership in the Jewish community.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p134-136, 138, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6855
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The North Carolina Community College System is the country's third largest. Around 800,000 students are served by 58 colleges with more than 100 campuses. Not only does the system provide citizens with basic skills for the workplace, it also makes available and provides higher education instruction. Gimpel highlights a number of the colleges and an offered specialty that is determined by the school's location: Brunswick Community College (aquaculture); Sandhills Community College (golf course management); and Surry Community College (grape cultivation and wine making).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p86-90, 92, 94-95, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6854
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Beaufort, founded in 1709, is North Carolina's third oldest town. Its twelve-block historic district contains over one hundred homes, many over a century old. Beaufort artist Mary Warshaw is re-creating on canvas one of the finest features of the homes - their porches. There is as much variety in how the porches were built as there is in the homes themselves. The earliest homes had steep-pitched roofs that covered full-length porches. Other homes have double porches, while others have porches that wrap around the house.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p38-40, 42, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6856
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Tomlin profiles three North Carolina women who have brought laughter to their audiences for a number of years. They are Jeanne Swanner Robertson, who was Miss North Carolina of 1963 and is now a professional humorist; Kelly Swanson, who created the town of Cedar Grove and its resident cast of colorful characters; and Celia Rivenbark, a syndicated newspaper columnist and author of several books of humor.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p54-56, 58, 61-62, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
6863
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Richard Stanhope Pullen had a dream for a park in Raleigh. On March 22, 1887, his dream became a reality when the park was donated to the city, making it the state's first public park. The National Amusement Park Historical Association lists Pullen Park as the fourteenth oldest amusement park in the world. The park's many offerings include sixty-eight tree-shaded acres, the historic C.P. Huntington miniature train, and playgrounds. The crown jewel, however, is the park's magical musical carousel. Built around 1900 and intricately hand-carved, the carousel is one of twenty-three remaining historic Dentzel Carousel Company machines still operating in North America. The carousel was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p172-175, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6862
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Fourteen species of gulls can be observed in North Carolina, depending on the season of the year, location, and being in the right place at the right time. Of that number, only three nest in the state-–the laughing gull, ring-billed gull, and herring gull. The other eleven gulls range from locally common to extremely rare. Adams describes physical features of the gulls and some of their behaviors, such as dropping shells onto rocks to break them open for food.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p162-163, 165, il Periodical Website
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